Computational creativity in a closed game system

Cameron Browne, Simon Colton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes the early stages of an experiment investigating the role of the computer as a creative collaborator in the game design process. We introduce the Shibumi set, a closed game system so simple that its rule space can be completely defined, yet deep enough to allow interesting games to emerge. Constraining the search space to such a closed system has computational benefits, but had unexpected effects on the creative process of designers during a related game design contest. These effects yield some insight into the creative process of experienced game designers, in particular, the way they search for rule sets to realise desired behaviours, and suggest a simple unified model of the game design process. We suggest ways in which these insights may be incorporated into future work, to produce software that might not only search for new games more effectively and assist the designer as a creative collaborator, but to automate the game design process in ways that might be perceived as more creative.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2012 IEEE Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games, CIG 2012
Pages296-303
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event2012 IEEE International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games, CIG 2012 - Granada, Spain
Duration: 11 Sep 201214 Sep 2012

Publication series

Name2012 IEEE Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games, CIG 2012

Conference

Conference2012 IEEE International Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games, CIG 2012
CountrySpain
CityGranada
Period11/09/1214/09/12

Cite this

Browne, C., & Colton, S. (2012). Computational creativity in a closed game system. In 2012 IEEE Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games, CIG 2012 (pp. 296-303). [6374169] (2012 IEEE Conference on Computational Intelligence and Games, CIG 2012). https://doi.org/10.1109/CIG.2012.6374169