Comparison of the longitudinal effects of persistent periodic breathing and apnoea on cerebral oxygenation in term- and preterm-born infants

Rosemary S.C. Horne, Sunjuri Sun, Stephanie R. Yiallourou, Karinna L. Fyfe, Alexsandria Odoi, Flora Y. Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Key points: Periodic breathing and apnoea were more common in preterm compared to age-matched term-born infants across the first 6 months after term-corrected age. Periodic breathing decreased with age in both term and preterm infants. Apnoea duration was not different between groups; however, the decline in apnoea index with postnatal age observed in the term infants was not seen in the preterm infants. Falls in tissue oxygenation index (brain TOI) associated with apnoeas were greater in the preterm infants at all three ages studied. The clinical significance of falls in brain TOI during periodic breathing and apnoea on neurodevelopmental outcome is unknown and warrants further investigations. Periodic breathing and short apnoeas are common in infants, particularly those born preterm, but are thought to be benign. The aim of our study was to assess the incidence and impact of periodic breathing and apnoea on heart rate, oxygen saturation and brain tissue oxygenation index (TOI) in infants born at term and preterm over the first 6 months after term equivalent age. Nineteen term-born infants (38-42 weeks gestational age) and 24 preterm infants (born at 27-36 weeks gestational age) were studied at 2-4 weeks, 2-3 months and 5-6 months post-term-corrected age during sleep. Periodic breathing episodes were defined as three or more sequential apnoeas each lasting ≥3 s and apnoeas as ≥3 s in duration. The mean duration of periodic breathing episodes was longer in term infants than in preterm infants at 2-4 weeks (P < 0.05) and at 5-6 months (P < 0.05); however, the nadir in TOI was significantly less in the term infants at 2-3 months (P < 0.001). Apnoea duration was not different between groups; however, the decline in apnoea index with postnatal age observed in the term infants was not seen in the preterm infants. Falls in TOI associated with apnoeas were greater in the preterm infants at all three ages studied. In conclusion, periodic breathing and short apnoeas were more common in infants born preterm and falls in cerebral oxygenation were greater than in the term group. The clinical significance of this on neurodevelopmental outcome is unknown and warrants further investigations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6021-6031
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume596
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

Keywords

  • Apnoea
  • Cerebral oxygenation
  • Infant

Cite this

@article{99616f7f98264889b24ab9bd77f10aac,
title = "Comparison of the longitudinal effects of persistent periodic breathing and apnoea on cerebral oxygenation in term- and preterm-born infants",
abstract = "Key points: Periodic breathing and apnoea were more common in preterm compared to age-matched term-born infants across the first 6 months after term-corrected age. Periodic breathing decreased with age in both term and preterm infants. Apnoea duration was not different between groups; however, the decline in apnoea index with postnatal age observed in the term infants was not seen in the preterm infants. Falls in tissue oxygenation index (brain TOI) associated with apnoeas were greater in the preterm infants at all three ages studied. The clinical significance of falls in brain TOI during periodic breathing and apnoea on neurodevelopmental outcome is unknown and warrants further investigations. Periodic breathing and short apnoeas are common in infants, particularly those born preterm, but are thought to be benign. The aim of our study was to assess the incidence and impact of periodic breathing and apnoea on heart rate, oxygen saturation and brain tissue oxygenation index (TOI) in infants born at term and preterm over the first 6 months after term equivalent age. Nineteen term-born infants (38-42 weeks gestational age) and 24 preterm infants (born at 27-36 weeks gestational age) were studied at 2-4 weeks, 2-3 months and 5-6 months post-term-corrected age during sleep. Periodic breathing episodes were defined as three or more sequential apnoeas each lasting ≥3 s and apnoeas as ≥3 s in duration. The mean duration of periodic breathing episodes was longer in term infants than in preterm infants at 2-4 weeks (P < 0.05) and at 5-6 months (P < 0.05); however, the nadir in TOI was significantly less in the term infants at 2-3 months (P < 0.001). Apnoea duration was not different between groups; however, the decline in apnoea index with postnatal age observed in the term infants was not seen in the preterm infants. Falls in TOI associated with apnoeas were greater in the preterm infants at all three ages studied. In conclusion, periodic breathing and short apnoeas were more common in infants born preterm and falls in cerebral oxygenation were greater than in the term group. The clinical significance of this on neurodevelopmental outcome is unknown and warrants further investigations.",
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Comparison of the longitudinal effects of persistent periodic breathing and apnoea on cerebral oxygenation in term- and preterm-born infants. / Horne, Rosemary S.C.; Sun, Sunjuri; Yiallourou, Stephanie R.; Fyfe, Karinna L.; Odoi, Alexsandria; Wong, Flora Y.

In: Journal of Physiology, Vol. 596, No. 23, 01.12.2018, p. 6021-6031.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of the longitudinal effects of persistent periodic breathing and apnoea on cerebral oxygenation in term- and preterm-born infants

AU - Horne, Rosemary S.C.

AU - Sun, Sunjuri

AU - Yiallourou, Stephanie R.

AU - Fyfe, Karinna L.

AU - Odoi, Alexsandria

AU - Wong, Flora Y.

PY - 2018/12/1

Y1 - 2018/12/1

N2 - Key points: Periodic breathing and apnoea were more common in preterm compared to age-matched term-born infants across the first 6 months after term-corrected age. Periodic breathing decreased with age in both term and preterm infants. Apnoea duration was not different between groups; however, the decline in apnoea index with postnatal age observed in the term infants was not seen in the preterm infants. Falls in tissue oxygenation index (brain TOI) associated with apnoeas were greater in the preterm infants at all three ages studied. The clinical significance of falls in brain TOI during periodic breathing and apnoea on neurodevelopmental outcome is unknown and warrants further investigations. Periodic breathing and short apnoeas are common in infants, particularly those born preterm, but are thought to be benign. The aim of our study was to assess the incidence and impact of periodic breathing and apnoea on heart rate, oxygen saturation and brain tissue oxygenation index (TOI) in infants born at term and preterm over the first 6 months after term equivalent age. Nineteen term-born infants (38-42 weeks gestational age) and 24 preterm infants (born at 27-36 weeks gestational age) were studied at 2-4 weeks, 2-3 months and 5-6 months post-term-corrected age during sleep. Periodic breathing episodes were defined as three or more sequential apnoeas each lasting ≥3 s and apnoeas as ≥3 s in duration. The mean duration of periodic breathing episodes was longer in term infants than in preterm infants at 2-4 weeks (P < 0.05) and at 5-6 months (P < 0.05); however, the nadir in TOI was significantly less in the term infants at 2-3 months (P < 0.001). Apnoea duration was not different between groups; however, the decline in apnoea index with postnatal age observed in the term infants was not seen in the preterm infants. Falls in TOI associated with apnoeas were greater in the preterm infants at all three ages studied. In conclusion, periodic breathing and short apnoeas were more common in infants born preterm and falls in cerebral oxygenation were greater than in the term group. The clinical significance of this on neurodevelopmental outcome is unknown and warrants further investigations.

AB - Key points: Periodic breathing and apnoea were more common in preterm compared to age-matched term-born infants across the first 6 months after term-corrected age. Periodic breathing decreased with age in both term and preterm infants. Apnoea duration was not different between groups; however, the decline in apnoea index with postnatal age observed in the term infants was not seen in the preterm infants. Falls in tissue oxygenation index (brain TOI) associated with apnoeas were greater in the preterm infants at all three ages studied. The clinical significance of falls in brain TOI during periodic breathing and apnoea on neurodevelopmental outcome is unknown and warrants further investigations. Periodic breathing and short apnoeas are common in infants, particularly those born preterm, but are thought to be benign. The aim of our study was to assess the incidence and impact of periodic breathing and apnoea on heart rate, oxygen saturation and brain tissue oxygenation index (TOI) in infants born at term and preterm over the first 6 months after term equivalent age. Nineteen term-born infants (38-42 weeks gestational age) and 24 preterm infants (born at 27-36 weeks gestational age) were studied at 2-4 weeks, 2-3 months and 5-6 months post-term-corrected age during sleep. Periodic breathing episodes were defined as three or more sequential apnoeas each lasting ≥3 s and apnoeas as ≥3 s in duration. The mean duration of periodic breathing episodes was longer in term infants than in preterm infants at 2-4 weeks (P < 0.05) and at 5-6 months (P < 0.05); however, the nadir in TOI was significantly less in the term infants at 2-3 months (P < 0.001). Apnoea duration was not different between groups; however, the decline in apnoea index with postnatal age observed in the term infants was not seen in the preterm infants. Falls in TOI associated with apnoeas were greater in the preterm infants at all three ages studied. In conclusion, periodic breathing and short apnoeas were more common in infants born preterm and falls in cerebral oxygenation were greater than in the term group. The clinical significance of this on neurodevelopmental outcome is unknown and warrants further investigations.

KW - Apnoea

KW - Cerebral oxygenation

KW - Infant

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