Cochlear Nucleus 7 Battery Charging System

Rowan Page (Designer), Mark Armstrong (Designer), Mark Richardson (Designer), Arthur De Bono (Designer), Cochlear Ltd (Photographer)

Research output: Non-textual formDesign / ArchitectureResearch

Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationSydney, NSW, Australia
PublisherCochlear Ltd
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Cite this

Page, R. (Designer), Armstrong, M. (Designer), Richardson, M. (Designer), De Bono, A. (Designer), & Cochlear Ltd (Photographer). (2017). Cochlear Nucleus 7 Battery Charging System. Design / Architecture, Sydney, NSW, Australia: Cochlear Ltd.
@misc{205e339c01e24a80bc17bf10f2903fb8,
title = "Cochlear Nucleus 7 Battery Charging System",
author = "Rowan Page and Mark Armstrong and Mark Richardson and {De Bono}, Arthur and {Cochlear Ltd}",
note = "battery chargers, various dimensions RESEARCH BACKGROUND: This project is situated in the field of medical device design exploring issues of use and ergonomics. Issues of use error are the leading cause of medical device failure attributable to 70{\%} of medical device-related incidents (Doyle, Gurses, & Pronovost, 2016). This project sought to apply tools from the United States Food and Drug Administration guidance; Applying Human Factors and Usability Engineering to Medical Devices (2016), while also exploring how user experience design methods can augment and enhance these human factors approaches. The project focused on the design of two battery recharging devices for a next-generation Cochlear implant system. RESEARCH CONTRIBUTION: A task analysis of the existing cochlear implant system identified that many users experienced difficulty connecting rechargeable batteries. This lead to redesigning the charger to mirror the form and interactions of connecting batteries to the sound processor, creating a consistent and ergonomic experience. Yet, the greatest insights in the project came from the parallel co-design activity exploring user’s experiences. Informing two interventions beyond providing ‘solutions’ to ergonomic issues. The first was the observation that many users experienced a fear of running out of charge even though this was a rare occurrence. This lead to the design of a portable keyring charger; allowing users to carry and charge a spare battery. The second intervention was a switch to a USB charging ecosystem, allowing users to tap into mobile phone chargers, car chargers, international chargers etc. RESEARCH SIGNIFICANCE: These interventions produced opportunities to enhance the user experience beyond just addressing use error, and were co-created with feedback from the users themselves. Instead of changing just how the charger is used, these interventions changed how users approached the behaviour of charging in general, and their feelings towards it. This demonstrated the benefits of augmenting human factors approaches to medical device usability design with methods of co-design from user experience design frameworks for usability. These devices were tested by Cochlear Ltd. as part of formal usability testing, and are now being mass manufactured and sold globally.",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
publisher = "Cochlear Ltd",

}

Page, R, Armstrong, M, Richardson, M, De Bono, A & Cochlear Ltd, Cochlear Nucleus 7 Battery Charging System, 2017, Design / Architecture, Cochlear Ltd, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
Cochlear Nucleus 7 Battery Charging System. Page, Rowan (Designer); Armstrong, Mark (Designer); Richardson, Mark (Designer); De Bono, Arthur (Designer); Cochlear Ltd (Photographer). 2017. Sydney, NSW, Australia : Cochlear Ltd.

Research output: Non-textual formDesign / ArchitectureResearch

TY - ADVS

T1 - Cochlear Nucleus 7 Battery Charging System

A2 - Page, Rowan

A2 - Armstrong, Mark

A2 - Richardson, Mark

A2 - De Bono, Arthur

A2 - Cochlear Ltd

N1 - battery chargers, various dimensions RESEARCH BACKGROUND: This project is situated in the field of medical device design exploring issues of use and ergonomics. Issues of use error are the leading cause of medical device failure attributable to 70% of medical device-related incidents (Doyle, Gurses, & Pronovost, 2016). This project sought to apply tools from the United States Food and Drug Administration guidance; Applying Human Factors and Usability Engineering to Medical Devices (2016), while also exploring how user experience design methods can augment and enhance these human factors approaches. The project focused on the design of two battery recharging devices for a next-generation Cochlear implant system. RESEARCH CONTRIBUTION: A task analysis of the existing cochlear implant system identified that many users experienced difficulty connecting rechargeable batteries. This lead to redesigning the charger to mirror the form and interactions of connecting batteries to the sound processor, creating a consistent and ergonomic experience. Yet, the greatest insights in the project came from the parallel co-design activity exploring user’s experiences. Informing two interventions beyond providing ‘solutions’ to ergonomic issues. The first was the observation that many users experienced a fear of running out of charge even though this was a rare occurrence. This lead to the design of a portable keyring charger; allowing users to carry and charge a spare battery. The second intervention was a switch to a USB charging ecosystem, allowing users to tap into mobile phone chargers, car chargers, international chargers etc. RESEARCH SIGNIFICANCE: These interventions produced opportunities to enhance the user experience beyond just addressing use error, and were co-created with feedback from the users themselves. Instead of changing just how the charger is used, these interventions changed how users approached the behaviour of charging in general, and their feelings towards it. This demonstrated the benefits of augmenting human factors approaches to medical device usability design with methods of co-design from user experience design frameworks for usability. These devices were tested by Cochlear Ltd. as part of formal usability testing, and are now being mass manufactured and sold globally.

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PB - Cochlear Ltd

CY - Sydney, NSW, Australia

ER -