Clinical supervision training across contexts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Clinicians require specific skills to teach or supervise students in the workplace; however, there are barriers to accessing faculty member development, such as time, cost and suitability. The Clinical Supervision Support Across Contexts (ClinSSAC) programme was designed to provide accessible interprofessional educator training to clinical supervisors across a wide range of clinical settings. Context: In Australia there are increasing numbers of health care students, creating pressure on existing placements. Students are now increasingly learning in community settings, where clinicians have traditionally had less access to faculty member development. Innovation: An interprofessional team collaborated in the development and implementation of ClinSSAC. A total of 978 clinicians participated in a face-to-face, interactive, introductory module to clinical supervision; 672 people accessed the equivalent online core module, with 23 per cent completing all activities. Additional profession-and discipline-specific modules were also developed. Implications: Formal project evaluation found that most participants rated the workshops as helpful or very helpful for their roles as clinical supervisors. Interdisciplinary learning from the workshops was reported to enable cross-discipline supervision. Large participant numbers and favourable ratings indicate a continuing need for basic training in education. Key factors to workshop success included expert facilitators, the interprofessional context and interactive model. The online modules were an important adjunct, and provided context-specific resources, but the low online completion rate suggests protected face-to-face time for faculty member development is still required. Programmes such as ClinSSAC have the capacity to promote interprofessional education and practice. There are barriers to accessing faculty member development, such as time, cost and suitability
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)262-266
Number of pages5
JournalThe Clinical Teacher
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016

Cite this

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title = "Clinical supervision training across contexts",
abstract = "Background: Clinicians require specific skills to teach or supervise students in the workplace; however, there are barriers to accessing faculty member development, such as time, cost and suitability. The Clinical Supervision Support Across Contexts (ClinSSAC) programme was designed to provide accessible interprofessional educator training to clinical supervisors across a wide range of clinical settings. Context: In Australia there are increasing numbers of health care students, creating pressure on existing placements. Students are now increasingly learning in community settings, where clinicians have traditionally had less access to faculty member development. Innovation: An interprofessional team collaborated in the development and implementation of ClinSSAC. A total of 978 clinicians participated in a face-to-face, interactive, introductory module to clinical supervision; 672 people accessed the equivalent online core module, with 23 per cent completing all activities. Additional profession-and discipline-specific modules were also developed. Implications: Formal project evaluation found that most participants rated the workshops as helpful or very helpful for their roles as clinical supervisors. Interdisciplinary learning from the workshops was reported to enable cross-discipline supervision. Large participant numbers and favourable ratings indicate a continuing need for basic training in education. Key factors to workshop success included expert facilitators, the interprofessional context and interactive model. The online modules were an important adjunct, and provided context-specific resources, but the low online completion rate suggests protected face-to-face time for faculty member development is still required. Programmes such as ClinSSAC have the capacity to promote interprofessional education and practice. There are barriers to accessing faculty member development, such as time, cost and suitability",
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Clinical supervision training across contexts. / Tai, Joanna; Bearman, Margaret; Edouard, Vicki; Kent, Fiona; Nestel, Debra; Molloy, Elizabeth.

In: The Clinical Teacher, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.08.2016, p. 262-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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