Client acceptability of the use of computers in a sexual health clinic

R. L. Tideman, M. K. Pitts, C. K. Fairley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Computers in sexual health medicine largely remain provider-centred for use in client care, data collection, administration and education. As a formative study for further work we undertook a cross-sectional survey of 679 consecutive new clients attending Melbourne Sexual Health clinic (MSHC) between 9 September 2002 and 15 October 2002 to establish client familiarity and experience with computers and acceptance of computer use in the clinic. A response rate of 616/679 (91%) was achieved. Important findings were 1. 491/612 (80%) participants reported experience with a personal computer. 2. The majority 488/609 (80%) of clients expected computer technologies to be used in the clinic. 3. The proportion of clients not willing to supply their registration, general health or sexual behaviour details using a computer was 9%, 7% and 21%, respectively. 4. Clients assessed as being at higher risk of acquiring a sexually transmitted infection were no more reluctant than others to provide their details using a computer-assisted self-interview.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-123
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2006

Keywords

  • Clients
  • Computer
  • Computer literacy
  • Computer-assisted self-interview
  • Sexual health clinic

Cite this

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Client acceptability of the use of computers in a sexual health clinic. / Tideman, R. L.; Pitts, M. K.; Fairley, C. K.

In: International Journal of STD and AIDS, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.02.2006, p. 121-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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