Citizens as Scientists: What influences public contributions to marine research?

Victoria Martin, Liam Smith, Alison Bowling, Les Christidis, David Lloyd, Gretta Pecl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Public participation in science is burgeoning, yet little is known about factors that influence potential volunteers. We present results from a national survey of 1,145 marine users to uncover the drivers and barriers to a sightings-based, digital marine citizen science project. Knowledge of marine species is the most significant barrier and driver for participation. Many marine users perceive that they have insufficient knowledge of marine species to contribute to the project, yet they expect to learn more about marine species if they were to participate. Contributing to scientific knowledge is also a strong driver for many marine users to participate.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)495-522
Number of pages28
JournalScience Communication
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016

Keywords

  • citizen science
  • public participation
  • science engagement
  • theory of planned behavior

Cite this

Martin, Victoria ; Smith, Liam ; Bowling, Alison ; Christidis, Les ; Lloyd, David ; Pecl, Gretta. / Citizens as Scientists : What influences public contributions to marine research?. In: Science Communication. 2016 ; Vol. 38, No. 4. pp. 495-522.
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Citizens as Scientists : What influences public contributions to marine research? / Martin, Victoria; Smith, Liam; Bowling, Alison; Christidis, Les; Lloyd, David; Pecl, Gretta.

In: Science Communication, Vol. 38, No. 4, 01.08.2016, p. 495-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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