Chronic thresholds for evoking perceptual responses in the rat sensory cortex

Emma Kate Brunton, Edwin BingBing Yan, Katherine Louise Gillespie-jones, Arthur James Lowery, Ramesh Rajan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stimulation of neural tissue for the remediation of brain and sensory deficits requires that stimulation paradigms are selected carefully to deliver the most stable, efficient and safest stimulation to evoke the desired therapeutic response. Here we asked two questions of a penetrating cortical prosthesis use to evoke sensory-guided behavior: 1) does the threshold charge required to evoke a behavioral response change over time? 2) what effect does changing the frequency of stimulation have on stimulus threshold? To answer these questions we implanted a 4-electrode array into the somatosensory (tactile) cortex of a Sprague Dawley rat. The threshold charge to evoke a behavioral response was measured weekly over a 9-week period. Stimulation frequencies of 50 or 200 Hz were used, while all other stimulus parameters were kept constant. Within a maximum current limit of 100 ?A and with a pulse width of 200 ?s, we reliably elicited a behavioral response on 2 electrodes. Over the 9 week implantation period there was an initial increase in threshold current at 4 weeks, followed by a decrease at week 5 post-implantation; by week 8 post-implantation, thresholds appeared to have stabilized. Although we could reliably evoke a response at both 50 and 200 Hz, the stimulus frequency of 50 Hz required on average a lower threshold charge to evoke a response.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER 2015)
EditorsThomas Stieglitz, Christine Azevedo-Coste
Place of PublicationWashington DC USA
PublisherIEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Pages502 - 505
Number of pages4
Volume1
ISBN (Print)9781467363891
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventInternational IEEE Engineering-in-Medicine-and-Biology-Society (EMBS) Conference on Neural Engineering (NER) 2015 - Montpellier France, Montpellier, France
Duration: 22 Apr 201524 Apr 2015
Conference number: 7th
https://www.ieee.org/conferences_events/conferences/conferencedetails/index.html?Conf_ID=31340

Conference

ConferenceInternational IEEE Engineering-in-Medicine-and-Biology-Society (EMBS) Conference on Neural Engineering (NER) 2015
Abbreviated titleNER 2015
CountryFrance
CityMontpellier
Period22/04/1524/04/15
Other2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)
Internet address

Cite this

Brunton, E. K., Yan, E. B., Gillespie-jones, K. L., Lowery, A. J., & Rajan, R. (2015). Chronic thresholds for evoking perceptual responses in the rat sensory cortex. In T. Stieglitz, & C. Azevedo-Coste (Eds.), 2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER 2015) (Vol. 1, pp. 502 - 505). Washington DC USA: IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1109/NER.2015.7146669
Brunton, Emma Kate ; Yan, Edwin BingBing ; Gillespie-jones, Katherine Louise ; Lowery, Arthur James ; Rajan, Ramesh. / Chronic thresholds for evoking perceptual responses in the rat sensory cortex. 2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER 2015). editor / Thomas Stieglitz ; Christine Azevedo-Coste. Vol. 1 Washington DC USA : IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2015. pp. 502 - 505
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abstract = "Stimulation of neural tissue for the remediation of brain and sensory deficits requires that stimulation paradigms are selected carefully to deliver the most stable, efficient and safest stimulation to evoke the desired therapeutic response. Here we asked two questions of a penetrating cortical prosthesis use to evoke sensory-guided behavior: 1) does the threshold charge required to evoke a behavioral response change over time? 2) what effect does changing the frequency of stimulation have on stimulus threshold? To answer these questions we implanted a 4-electrode array into the somatosensory (tactile) cortex of a Sprague Dawley rat. The threshold charge to evoke a behavioral response was measured weekly over a 9-week period. Stimulation frequencies of 50 or 200 Hz were used, while all other stimulus parameters were kept constant. Within a maximum current limit of 100 ?A and with a pulse width of 200 ?s, we reliably elicited a behavioral response on 2 electrodes. Over the 9 week implantation period there was an initial increase in threshold current at 4 weeks, followed by a decrease at week 5 post-implantation; by week 8 post-implantation, thresholds appeared to have stabilized. Although we could reliably evoke a response at both 50 and 200 Hz, the stimulus frequency of 50 Hz required on average a lower threshold charge to evoke a response.",
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Brunton, EK, Yan, EB, Gillespie-jones, KL, Lowery, AJ & Rajan, R 2015, Chronic thresholds for evoking perceptual responses in the rat sensory cortex. in T Stieglitz & C Azevedo-Coste (eds), 2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER 2015). vol. 1, IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Washington DC USA, pp. 502 - 505, International IEEE Engineering-in-Medicine-and-Biology-Society (EMBS) Conference on Neural Engineering (NER) 2015, Montpellier, France, 22/04/15. https://doi.org/10.1109/NER.2015.7146669

Chronic thresholds for evoking perceptual responses in the rat sensory cortex. / Brunton, Emma Kate; Yan, Edwin BingBing; Gillespie-jones, Katherine Louise; Lowery, Arthur James; Rajan, Ramesh.

2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER 2015). ed. / Thomas Stieglitz; Christine Azevedo-Coste. Vol. 1 Washington DC USA : IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2015. p. 502 - 505.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperResearchpeer-review

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N2 - Stimulation of neural tissue for the remediation of brain and sensory deficits requires that stimulation paradigms are selected carefully to deliver the most stable, efficient and safest stimulation to evoke the desired therapeutic response. Here we asked two questions of a penetrating cortical prosthesis use to evoke sensory-guided behavior: 1) does the threshold charge required to evoke a behavioral response change over time? 2) what effect does changing the frequency of stimulation have on stimulus threshold? To answer these questions we implanted a 4-electrode array into the somatosensory (tactile) cortex of a Sprague Dawley rat. The threshold charge to evoke a behavioral response was measured weekly over a 9-week period. Stimulation frequencies of 50 or 200 Hz were used, while all other stimulus parameters were kept constant. Within a maximum current limit of 100 ?A and with a pulse width of 200 ?s, we reliably elicited a behavioral response on 2 electrodes. Over the 9 week implantation period there was an initial increase in threshold current at 4 weeks, followed by a decrease at week 5 post-implantation; by week 8 post-implantation, thresholds appeared to have stabilized. Although we could reliably evoke a response at both 50 and 200 Hz, the stimulus frequency of 50 Hz required on average a lower threshold charge to evoke a response.

AB - Stimulation of neural tissue for the remediation of brain and sensory deficits requires that stimulation paradigms are selected carefully to deliver the most stable, efficient and safest stimulation to evoke the desired therapeutic response. Here we asked two questions of a penetrating cortical prosthesis use to evoke sensory-guided behavior: 1) does the threshold charge required to evoke a behavioral response change over time? 2) what effect does changing the frequency of stimulation have on stimulus threshold? To answer these questions we implanted a 4-electrode array into the somatosensory (tactile) cortex of a Sprague Dawley rat. The threshold charge to evoke a behavioral response was measured weekly over a 9-week period. Stimulation frequencies of 50 or 200 Hz were used, while all other stimulus parameters were kept constant. Within a maximum current limit of 100 ?A and with a pulse width of 200 ?s, we reliably elicited a behavioral response on 2 electrodes. Over the 9 week implantation period there was an initial increase in threshold current at 4 weeks, followed by a decrease at week 5 post-implantation; by week 8 post-implantation, thresholds appeared to have stabilized. Although we could reliably evoke a response at both 50 and 200 Hz, the stimulus frequency of 50 Hz required on average a lower threshold charge to evoke a response.

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DO - 10.1109/NER.2015.7146669

M3 - Conference Paper

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EP - 505

BT - 2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER 2015)

A2 - Stieglitz, Thomas

A2 - Azevedo-Coste, Christine

PB - IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

CY - Washington DC USA

ER -

Brunton EK, Yan EB, Gillespie-jones KL, Lowery AJ, Rajan R. Chronic thresholds for evoking perceptual responses in the rat sensory cortex. In Stieglitz T, Azevedo-Coste C, editors, 2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER 2015). Vol. 1. Washington DC USA: IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. 2015. p. 502 - 505 https://doi.org/10.1109/NER.2015.7146669