Chronic recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water intake exacerbates hypertension and promotes renal damage in male spontaneously hypertensive rats

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Abstract

Epidemiological evidence links recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water intake with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, minimal attention has been paid to the long-term impact of periodic water intake on the progression of CKD and underlying mechanisms involved. Therefore we investigated the chronic effects of recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water restriction on arterial pressure and kidney function and morphology in male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Arterial pressure increased and glomerular filtration rate decreased in water-restricted SHR. This was observed in association with cyclic changes in urine osmolarity, indicative of recurrent dehydration. Additionally, water-restricted SHR demonstrated greater renal fibrosis and an imbalance in favour of pro-inflammatory cytokine-producing renal T cells compared to their control counterparts. Furthermore, urinary NGAL levels were greater in water-restricted than control SHR. Taken together, our results provide significant evidence that recurrent dehydration associated with chronic periodic drinking hastens the progression of CKD and hypertension, and suggest a potential role for repetitive bouts of acute renal injury driving renal inflammatory processes in this setting. Further studies are required to elucidate the specific pathways that drive the progression of recurrent dehydration-induced kidney disease.

Original languageEnglish
Article number33855
Number of pages13
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Sep 2016

Keywords

  • end-stage renal disease
  • experimental models of disease

Cite this

@article{e402dec2d6cb4c55a2ef85a8ad68e169,
title = "Chronic recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water intake exacerbates hypertension and promotes renal damage in male spontaneously hypertensive rats",
abstract = "Epidemiological evidence links recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water intake with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, minimal attention has been paid to the long-term impact of periodic water intake on the progression of CKD and underlying mechanisms involved. Therefore we investigated the chronic effects of recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water restriction on arterial pressure and kidney function and morphology in male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Arterial pressure increased and glomerular filtration rate decreased in water-restricted SHR. This was observed in association with cyclic changes in urine osmolarity, indicative of recurrent dehydration. Additionally, water-restricted SHR demonstrated greater renal fibrosis and an imbalance in favour of pro-inflammatory cytokine-producing renal T cells compared to their control counterparts. Furthermore, urinary NGAL levels were greater in water-restricted than control SHR. Taken together, our results provide significant evidence that recurrent dehydration associated with chronic periodic drinking hastens the progression of CKD and hypertension, and suggest a potential role for repetitive bouts of acute renal injury driving renal inflammatory processes in this setting. Further studies are required to elucidate the specific pathways that drive the progression of recurrent dehydration-induced kidney disease.",
keywords = "end-stage renal disease, experimental models of disease",
author = "Hilliard, {Lucinda M.} and Colafella, {Katrina M. Mirabito} and Bulmer, {Louise L.} and Puelles, {Victor G.} and Singh, {Reetu R.} and Ow, {Connie P. C.} and Tracey Gaspari and Drummond, {Grant R.} and Evans, {Roger G.} and Antony Vinh and Denton, {Kate M.}",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1038/srep33855",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chronic recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water intake exacerbates hypertension and promotes renal damage in male spontaneously hypertensive rats

AU - Hilliard, Lucinda M.

AU - Colafella, Katrina M. Mirabito

AU - Bulmer, Louise L.

AU - Puelles, Victor G.

AU - Singh, Reetu R.

AU - Ow, Connie P. C.

AU - Gaspari, Tracey

AU - Drummond, Grant R.

AU - Evans, Roger G.

AU - Vinh, Antony

AU - Denton, Kate M.

PY - 2016/9/22

Y1 - 2016/9/22

N2 - Epidemiological evidence links recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water intake with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, minimal attention has been paid to the long-term impact of periodic water intake on the progression of CKD and underlying mechanisms involved. Therefore we investigated the chronic effects of recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water restriction on arterial pressure and kidney function and morphology in male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Arterial pressure increased and glomerular filtration rate decreased in water-restricted SHR. This was observed in association with cyclic changes in urine osmolarity, indicative of recurrent dehydration. Additionally, water-restricted SHR demonstrated greater renal fibrosis and an imbalance in favour of pro-inflammatory cytokine-producing renal T cells compared to their control counterparts. Furthermore, urinary NGAL levels were greater in water-restricted than control SHR. Taken together, our results provide significant evidence that recurrent dehydration associated with chronic periodic drinking hastens the progression of CKD and hypertension, and suggest a potential role for repetitive bouts of acute renal injury driving renal inflammatory processes in this setting. Further studies are required to elucidate the specific pathways that drive the progression of recurrent dehydration-induced kidney disease.

AB - Epidemiological evidence links recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water intake with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, minimal attention has been paid to the long-term impact of periodic water intake on the progression of CKD and underlying mechanisms involved. Therefore we investigated the chronic effects of recurrent dehydration associated with periodic water restriction on arterial pressure and kidney function and morphology in male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Arterial pressure increased and glomerular filtration rate decreased in water-restricted SHR. This was observed in association with cyclic changes in urine osmolarity, indicative of recurrent dehydration. Additionally, water-restricted SHR demonstrated greater renal fibrosis and an imbalance in favour of pro-inflammatory cytokine-producing renal T cells compared to their control counterparts. Furthermore, urinary NGAL levels were greater in water-restricted than control SHR. Taken together, our results provide significant evidence that recurrent dehydration associated with chronic periodic drinking hastens the progression of CKD and hypertension, and suggest a potential role for repetitive bouts of acute renal injury driving renal inflammatory processes in this setting. Further studies are required to elucidate the specific pathways that drive the progression of recurrent dehydration-induced kidney disease.

KW - end-stage renal disease

KW - experimental models of disease

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DO - 10.1038/srep33855

M3 - Article

VL - 6

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

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