Chlamydia testing and retesting patterns at family planning clinics in Australia

Anna L Bowring, Jane L Goller, Maelenn Gouillou, Caroline Harvey, Deborah Bateson, Kathleen Margaret McNamee, Christine Read, Douglas Boyle, Lynne Jordan, Robyn Wardle, Anne Stephens, Basil Donovan, Rebecca Guy, Margaret Elena Hellard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction National guidelines recommend opportunistic chlamydia screening of sexually active 16- to 29-year-olds and encourage retesting 3-12 months after a diagnosed chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) infection. We assessed chlamydia testing patterns at five Australian family planning clinics (FPCs). Methods: Using routine clinic data from 16- to 29-year-olds, we calculated chlamydia testing and positivity rates in 2008-2009. Reattendance, retesting and positivity rates at retesting within 1.5-4 and 1.5-12 months of a positive result were calculated. Results: Over 2 years, 13?690 individuals aged 16-29 years attended five FPCs (93 female). In 2008, 3159 females (41.4 ,) and 263 males (57.0 ) were tested for chlamydia; positivity was 8 and 19 , respectively. In 2009, 3178 females (39.6 ) and 295 males (57.2 ) were tested; positivity was 8 and 23 , respectively. Of 7637 females attending in 2008, 38 also attended in 2009, of which 20 were tested both years. Within 1.5-4 months of a positive test, 83 (31.1 ) females reattended; the retesting rate was 13 and 12 retested positive. Within 1.5-12 months of a positive test, 96 (57.5 ) females reattended; the retesting rate was 36 and 13 retested positive. Conclusions: Approximately 40 of young people attending FPCs were tested for chlamydia but a smaller proportion were tested annually or were retested following chlamydia infection. High positivity rates emphasise that FPCs see a high-risk population. To maximise testing opportunities, clinical prompts, patient reminder systems and non-clinic testing strategies may be needed
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)74 - 81
Number of pages8
JournalSexual Health
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

Bowring, Anna L ; Goller, Jane L ; Gouillou, Maelenn ; Harvey, Caroline ; Bateson, Deborah ; McNamee, Kathleen Margaret ; Read, Christine ; Boyle, Douglas ; Jordan, Lynne ; Wardle, Robyn ; Stephens, Anne ; Donovan, Basil ; Guy, Rebecca ; Hellard, Margaret Elena. / Chlamydia testing and retesting patterns at family planning clinics in Australia. In: Sexual Health. 2013 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 74 - 81.
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title = "Chlamydia testing and retesting patterns at family planning clinics in Australia",
abstract = "Introduction National guidelines recommend opportunistic chlamydia screening of sexually active 16- to 29-year-olds and encourage retesting 3-12 months after a diagnosed chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) infection. We assessed chlamydia testing patterns at five Australian family planning clinics (FPCs). Methods: Using routine clinic data from 16- to 29-year-olds, we calculated chlamydia testing and positivity rates in 2008-2009. Reattendance, retesting and positivity rates at retesting within 1.5-4 and 1.5-12 months of a positive result were calculated. Results: Over 2 years, 13?690 individuals aged 16-29 years attended five FPCs (93 female). In 2008, 3159 females (41.4 ,) and 263 males (57.0 ) were tested for chlamydia; positivity was 8 and 19 , respectively. In 2009, 3178 females (39.6 ) and 295 males (57.2 ) were tested; positivity was 8 and 23 , respectively. Of 7637 females attending in 2008, 38 also attended in 2009, of which 20 were tested both years. Within 1.5-4 months of a positive test, 83 (31.1 ) females reattended; the retesting rate was 13 and 12 retested positive. Within 1.5-12 months of a positive test, 96 (57.5 ) females reattended; the retesting rate was 36 and 13 retested positive. Conclusions: Approximately 40 of young people attending FPCs were tested for chlamydia but a smaller proportion were tested annually or were retested following chlamydia infection. High positivity rates emphasise that FPCs see a high-risk population. To maximise testing opportunities, clinical prompts, patient reminder systems and non-clinic testing strategies may be needed",
author = "Bowring, {Anna L} and Goller, {Jane L} and Maelenn Gouillou and Caroline Harvey and Deborah Bateson and McNamee, {Kathleen Margaret} and Christine Read and Douglas Boyle and Lynne Jordan and Robyn Wardle and Anne Stephens and Basil Donovan and Rebecca Guy and Hellard, {Margaret Elena}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1071/SH11187",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "74 -- 81",
journal = "Sexual Health",
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Bowring, AL, Goller, JL, Gouillou, M, Harvey, C, Bateson, D, McNamee, KM, Read, C, Boyle, D, Jordan, L, Wardle, R, Stephens, A, Donovan, B, Guy, R & Hellard, ME 2013, 'Chlamydia testing and retesting patterns at family planning clinics in Australia', Sexual Health, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 74 - 81. https://doi.org/10.1071/SH11187

Chlamydia testing and retesting patterns at family planning clinics in Australia. / Bowring, Anna L; Goller, Jane L; Gouillou, Maelenn; Harvey, Caroline; Bateson, Deborah; McNamee, Kathleen Margaret; Read, Christine; Boyle, Douglas; Jordan, Lynne; Wardle, Robyn; Stephens, Anne; Donovan, Basil; Guy, Rebecca; Hellard, Margaret Elena.

In: Sexual Health, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2013, p. 74 - 81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chlamydia testing and retesting patterns at family planning clinics in Australia

AU - Bowring, Anna L

AU - Goller, Jane L

AU - Gouillou, Maelenn

AU - Harvey, Caroline

AU - Bateson, Deborah

AU - McNamee, Kathleen Margaret

AU - Read, Christine

AU - Boyle, Douglas

AU - Jordan, Lynne

AU - Wardle, Robyn

AU - Stephens, Anne

AU - Donovan, Basil

AU - Guy, Rebecca

AU - Hellard, Margaret Elena

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Introduction National guidelines recommend opportunistic chlamydia screening of sexually active 16- to 29-year-olds and encourage retesting 3-12 months after a diagnosed chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) infection. We assessed chlamydia testing patterns at five Australian family planning clinics (FPCs). Methods: Using routine clinic data from 16- to 29-year-olds, we calculated chlamydia testing and positivity rates in 2008-2009. Reattendance, retesting and positivity rates at retesting within 1.5-4 and 1.5-12 months of a positive result were calculated. Results: Over 2 years, 13?690 individuals aged 16-29 years attended five FPCs (93 female). In 2008, 3159 females (41.4 ,) and 263 males (57.0 ) were tested for chlamydia; positivity was 8 and 19 , respectively. In 2009, 3178 females (39.6 ) and 295 males (57.2 ) were tested; positivity was 8 and 23 , respectively. Of 7637 females attending in 2008, 38 also attended in 2009, of which 20 were tested both years. Within 1.5-4 months of a positive test, 83 (31.1 ) females reattended; the retesting rate was 13 and 12 retested positive. Within 1.5-12 months of a positive test, 96 (57.5 ) females reattended; the retesting rate was 36 and 13 retested positive. Conclusions: Approximately 40 of young people attending FPCs were tested for chlamydia but a smaller proportion were tested annually or were retested following chlamydia infection. High positivity rates emphasise that FPCs see a high-risk population. To maximise testing opportunities, clinical prompts, patient reminder systems and non-clinic testing strategies may be needed

AB - Introduction National guidelines recommend opportunistic chlamydia screening of sexually active 16- to 29-year-olds and encourage retesting 3-12 months after a diagnosed chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) infection. We assessed chlamydia testing patterns at five Australian family planning clinics (FPCs). Methods: Using routine clinic data from 16- to 29-year-olds, we calculated chlamydia testing and positivity rates in 2008-2009. Reattendance, retesting and positivity rates at retesting within 1.5-4 and 1.5-12 months of a positive result were calculated. Results: Over 2 years, 13?690 individuals aged 16-29 years attended five FPCs (93 female). In 2008, 3159 females (41.4 ,) and 263 males (57.0 ) were tested for chlamydia; positivity was 8 and 19 , respectively. In 2009, 3178 females (39.6 ) and 295 males (57.2 ) were tested; positivity was 8 and 23 , respectively. Of 7637 females attending in 2008, 38 also attended in 2009, of which 20 were tested both years. Within 1.5-4 months of a positive test, 83 (31.1 ) females reattended; the retesting rate was 13 and 12 retested positive. Within 1.5-12 months of a positive test, 96 (57.5 ) females reattended; the retesting rate was 36 and 13 retested positive. Conclusions: Approximately 40 of young people attending FPCs were tested for chlamydia but a smaller proportion were tested annually or were retested following chlamydia infection. High positivity rates emphasise that FPCs see a high-risk population. To maximise testing opportunities, clinical prompts, patient reminder systems and non-clinic testing strategies may be needed

UR - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23256944

U2 - 10.1071/SH11187

DO - 10.1071/SH11187

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 74

EP - 81

JO - Sexual Health

JF - Sexual Health

SN - 1448-5028

IS - 1

ER -