Child Motivation and Family Environment Influence Outcomes of Working Memory Training in Extremely Preterm Children

Leona Pascoe, Megan Spencer-Smith, Joshua Wiley, Katherine Lee, Gehan Roberts, Elisha Josev, Chiara Nosarti, Marc Seal, Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis, Lex W Doyle, Deanne Thompson, Peter Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Cognitive training can improve working memory in children at risk of working memory difficulties; however, response to training can vary and doubt exists if working memory improvements can be sustained long- term. This study aimed to explore whether child motivation and family environment are associated with working memory trajectories in children born extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight. Forty-five 7-year-old children completed Cogmed Working Memory Training® at home over 5–7 weeks. Children and their families completed working memory tests and child motivation and family environment questionnaires at baseline, with working memory further tested 2 weeks, 12 months and 24 months post-training. Latent growth modelling was used to explore whether child motivation and family environment factors were associated with working memory trajectories. Children’s desire for challenge, training competence, and being from a single-parent household were associated with short-term improvements in verbal short-term memory. Children from poorer functioning families were associated with short-term improvements in working memory. There was little evidence that child motivation or family environment was associated with long-term working memory changes. Child motivation and the training environment may be important for understanding training effects in children born extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight, and warrant closer examination in working memory training studies.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cognitive Enhancement
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 3 Jun 2019

Keywords

  • working memory, cognitive training
  • prematurity
  • motivation
  • family functioning
  • individual differences

Cite this

@article{5974697536f54df5aac9d79f9dbda924,
title = "Child Motivation and Family Environment Influence Outcomes of Working Memory Training in Extremely Preterm Children",
abstract = "Cognitive training can improve working memory in children at risk of working memory difficulties; however, response to training can vary and doubt exists if working memory improvements can be sustained long- term. This study aimed to explore whether child motivation and family environment are associated with working memory trajectories in children born extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight. Forty-five 7-year-old children completed Cogmed Working Memory Training{\circledR} at home over 5–7 weeks. Children and their families completed working memory tests and child motivation and family environment questionnaires at baseline, with working memory further tested 2 weeks, 12 months and 24 months post-training. Latent growth modelling was used to explore whether child motivation and family environment factors were associated with working memory trajectories. Children’s desire for challenge, training competence, and being from a single-parent household were associated with short-term improvements in verbal short-term memory. Children from poorer functioning families were associated with short-term improvements in working memory. There was little evidence that child motivation or family environment was associated with long-term working memory changes. Child motivation and the training environment may be important for understanding training effects in children born extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight, and warrant closer examination in working memory training studies.",
keywords = "working memory, cognitive training, prematurity, motivation, family functioning, individual differences",
author = "Leona Pascoe and Megan Spencer-Smith and Joshua Wiley and Katherine Lee and Gehan Roberts and Elisha Josev and Chiara Nosarti and Marc Seal and Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis and Doyle, {Lex W} and Deanne Thompson and Peter Anderson",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1007/s41465-019-00138-3",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Cognitive Enhancement",
issn = "2509-3304",

}

Child Motivation and Family Environment Influence Outcomes of Working Memory Training in Extremely Preterm Children. / Pascoe, Leona; Spencer-Smith, Megan; Wiley, Joshua; Lee, Katherine; Roberts, Gehan; Josev, Elisha; Nosarti, Chiara; Seal, Marc; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Doyle, Lex W; Thompson, Deanne; Anderson, Peter .

In: Journal of Cognitive Enhancement, 03.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Child Motivation and Family Environment Influence Outcomes of Working Memory Training in Extremely Preterm Children

AU - Pascoe, Leona

AU - Spencer-Smith, Megan

AU - Wiley, Joshua

AU - Lee, Katherine

AU - Roberts, Gehan

AU - Josev, Elisha

AU - Nosarti, Chiara

AU - Seal, Marc

AU - Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie

AU - Doyle, Lex W

AU - Thompson, Deanne

AU - Anderson, Peter

PY - 2019/6/3

Y1 - 2019/6/3

N2 - Cognitive training can improve working memory in children at risk of working memory difficulties; however, response to training can vary and doubt exists if working memory improvements can be sustained long- term. This study aimed to explore whether child motivation and family environment are associated with working memory trajectories in children born extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight. Forty-five 7-year-old children completed Cogmed Working Memory Training® at home over 5–7 weeks. Children and their families completed working memory tests and child motivation and family environment questionnaires at baseline, with working memory further tested 2 weeks, 12 months and 24 months post-training. Latent growth modelling was used to explore whether child motivation and family environment factors were associated with working memory trajectories. Children’s desire for challenge, training competence, and being from a single-parent household were associated with short-term improvements in verbal short-term memory. Children from poorer functioning families were associated with short-term improvements in working memory. There was little evidence that child motivation or family environment was associated with long-term working memory changes. Child motivation and the training environment may be important for understanding training effects in children born extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight, and warrant closer examination in working memory training studies.

AB - Cognitive training can improve working memory in children at risk of working memory difficulties; however, response to training can vary and doubt exists if working memory improvements can be sustained long- term. This study aimed to explore whether child motivation and family environment are associated with working memory trajectories in children born extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight. Forty-five 7-year-old children completed Cogmed Working Memory Training® at home over 5–7 weeks. Children and their families completed working memory tests and child motivation and family environment questionnaires at baseline, with working memory further tested 2 weeks, 12 months and 24 months post-training. Latent growth modelling was used to explore whether child motivation and family environment factors were associated with working memory trajectories. Children’s desire for challenge, training competence, and being from a single-parent household were associated with short-term improvements in verbal short-term memory. Children from poorer functioning families were associated with short-term improvements in working memory. There was little evidence that child motivation or family environment was associated with long-term working memory changes. Child motivation and the training environment may be important for understanding training effects in children born extremely preterm or extremely low birth weight, and warrant closer examination in working memory training studies.

KW - working memory, cognitive training

KW - prematurity

KW - motivation

KW - family functioning

KW - individual differences

U2 - 10.1007/s41465-019-00138-3

DO - 10.1007/s41465-019-00138-3

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Cognitive Enhancement

JF - Journal of Cognitive Enhancement

SN - 2509-3304

ER -