Child health in West Bengal - Comparison with other regions in India

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

There are few areas where the statistics are as dismal as child health in India. This paper analyses four interrelated child health indicators in West Bengal - child malnourishment (measured by the rates of stunting and wasting), prenatal, infant, and child mortality rates. It also provides evidence on how these rates vary with the gender of the child, parental education, and the wealth status of households. West Bengal does not fare badly on child health in relation to the all-India figures and does better than the rest of east India, but lags behind south India. Its performance on mortality rates is much better than India as a whole, and, quite significantly, compares favourably with those in south India. However, effective policy interventions are required to delink maternal health from child health and the importance of this cannot be overstated.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)50 - 58
Number of pages9
JournalEconomic and Political Weekly: a journal of current economic and political affairs
Volume48
Issue number49
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Cite this

@article{8c8f328b0dc64a76bde3e11883aaa069,
title = "Child health in West Bengal - Comparison with other regions in India",
abstract = "There are few areas where the statistics are as dismal as child health in India. This paper analyses four interrelated child health indicators in West Bengal - child malnourishment (measured by the rates of stunting and wasting), prenatal, infant, and child mortality rates. It also provides evidence on how these rates vary with the gender of the child, parental education, and the wealth status of households. West Bengal does not fare badly on child health in relation to the all-India figures and does better than the rest of east India, but lags behind south India. Its performance on mortality rates is much better than India as a whole, and, quite significantly, compares favourably with those in south India. However, effective policy interventions are required to delink maternal health from child health and the importance of this cannot be overstated.",
author = "Pushkar Maitra and Ranjan Ray",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "50 -- 58",
journal = "Economic and Political Weekly: a journal of current economic and political affairs",
issn = "0012-9976",
number = "49",

}

Child health in West Bengal - Comparison with other regions in India. / Maitra, Pushkar; Ray, Ranjan.

In: Economic and Political Weekly: a journal of current economic and political affairs, Vol. 48, No. 49, 2013, p. 50 - 58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Child health in West Bengal - Comparison with other regions in India

AU - Maitra, Pushkar

AU - Ray, Ranjan

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - There are few areas where the statistics are as dismal as child health in India. This paper analyses four interrelated child health indicators in West Bengal - child malnourishment (measured by the rates of stunting and wasting), prenatal, infant, and child mortality rates. It also provides evidence on how these rates vary with the gender of the child, parental education, and the wealth status of households. West Bengal does not fare badly on child health in relation to the all-India figures and does better than the rest of east India, but lags behind south India. Its performance on mortality rates is much better than India as a whole, and, quite significantly, compares favourably with those in south India. However, effective policy interventions are required to delink maternal health from child health and the importance of this cannot be overstated.

AB - There are few areas where the statistics are as dismal as child health in India. This paper analyses four interrelated child health indicators in West Bengal - child malnourishment (measured by the rates of stunting and wasting), prenatal, infant, and child mortality rates. It also provides evidence on how these rates vary with the gender of the child, parental education, and the wealth status of households. West Bengal does not fare badly on child health in relation to the all-India figures and does better than the rest of east India, but lags behind south India. Its performance on mortality rates is much better than India as a whole, and, quite significantly, compares favourably with those in south India. However, effective policy interventions are required to delink maternal health from child health and the importance of this cannot be overstated.

M3 - Article

VL - 48

SP - 50

EP - 58

JO - Economic and Political Weekly: a journal of current economic and political affairs

JF - Economic and Political Weekly: a journal of current economic and political affairs

SN - 0012-9976

IS - 49

ER -