Characterization of handover orientations used by humans for efficient robot to human handovers

Wesley P. Chan, Matthew K.X.J. Pan, Elizabeth A. Croft, Masayuki Inaba

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperOther

Abstract

To enable robots to learn handover orientations from observing natural handovers, we conduct a user study to measure and compare natural handover orientations with giver-centered and receiver-centered handover orientations for twenty common objects. We use a distance minimization approach to compute mean handover orientations. We posit that, computed means of receiver-centered orientations could be used by robot givers to achieve more efficient and socially acceptable handovers. Furthermore, we introduce the notion of affordance axes for comparing handover orientations, and offer a definition for computing them. Observable patterns were found in receiver-centered handover orientations. Comparisons show that depending on the object, natural handover orientations may not be receiver-centered; thus, robots may need to distinguish between good and bad handover orientations when learning from natural handovers.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIROS Hamburg 2015 - Conference Digest
Subtitle of host publicationIEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems
PublisherIEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
Volume2015-December
ISBN (Electronic)9781479999941
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Dec 2015
Externally publishedYes
EventIEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems 2015 - Hamburg, Germany
Duration: 28 Sep 20152 Oct 2015

Conference

ConferenceIEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems 2015
Abbreviated titleIROS 2015
CountryGermany
CityHamburg
Period28/09/152/10/15

Keywords

  • Atmospheric measurements
  • Collaboration
  • Handover
  • Particle measurements
  • Receivers
  • Robots

Cite this

Chan, W. P., Pan, M. K. X. J., Croft, E. A., & Inaba, M. (2015). Characterization of handover orientations used by humans for efficient robot to human handovers. In IROS Hamburg 2015 - Conference Digest: IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (Vol. 2015-December, pp. 1-6). [7353106] IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1109/IROS.2015.7353106
Chan, Wesley P. ; Pan, Matthew K.X.J. ; Croft, Elizabeth A. ; Inaba, Masayuki. / Characterization of handover orientations used by humans for efficient robot to human handovers. IROS Hamburg 2015 - Conference Digest: IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems. Vol. 2015-December IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2015. pp. 1-6
@inproceedings{d0ee0e8294de4227833ac0dfd26581e4,
title = "Characterization of handover orientations used by humans for efficient robot to human handovers",
abstract = "To enable robots to learn handover orientations from observing natural handovers, we conduct a user study to measure and compare natural handover orientations with giver-centered and receiver-centered handover orientations for twenty common objects. We use a distance minimization approach to compute mean handover orientations. We posit that, computed means of receiver-centered orientations could be used by robot givers to achieve more efficient and socially acceptable handovers. Furthermore, we introduce the notion of affordance axes for comparing handover orientations, and offer a definition for computing them. Observable patterns were found in receiver-centered handover orientations. Comparisons show that depending on the object, natural handover orientations may not be receiver-centered; thus, robots may need to distinguish between good and bad handover orientations when learning from natural handovers.",
keywords = "Atmospheric measurements, Collaboration, Handover, Particle measurements, Receivers, Robots",
author = "Chan, {Wesley P.} and Pan, {Matthew K.X.J.} and Croft, {Elizabeth A.} and Masayuki Inaba",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1109/IROS.2015.7353106",
language = "English",
volume = "2015-December",
pages = "1--6",
booktitle = "IROS Hamburg 2015 - Conference Digest",
publisher = "IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers",
address = "United States of America",

}

Chan, WP, Pan, MKXJ, Croft, EA & Inaba, M 2015, Characterization of handover orientations used by humans for efficient robot to human handovers. in IROS Hamburg 2015 - Conference Digest: IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems. vol. 2015-December, 7353106, IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, pp. 1-6, IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems 2015, Hamburg, Germany, 28/09/15. https://doi.org/10.1109/IROS.2015.7353106

Characterization of handover orientations used by humans for efficient robot to human handovers. / Chan, Wesley P.; Pan, Matthew K.X.J.; Croft, Elizabeth A.; Inaba, Masayuki.

IROS Hamburg 2015 - Conference Digest: IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems. Vol. 2015-December IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, 2015. p. 1-6 7353106.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperOther

TY - GEN

T1 - Characterization of handover orientations used by humans for efficient robot to human handovers

AU - Chan, Wesley P.

AU - Pan, Matthew K.X.J.

AU - Croft, Elizabeth A.

AU - Inaba, Masayuki

PY - 2015/12/11

Y1 - 2015/12/11

N2 - To enable robots to learn handover orientations from observing natural handovers, we conduct a user study to measure and compare natural handover orientations with giver-centered and receiver-centered handover orientations for twenty common objects. We use a distance minimization approach to compute mean handover orientations. We posit that, computed means of receiver-centered orientations could be used by robot givers to achieve more efficient and socially acceptable handovers. Furthermore, we introduce the notion of affordance axes for comparing handover orientations, and offer a definition for computing them. Observable patterns were found in receiver-centered handover orientations. Comparisons show that depending on the object, natural handover orientations may not be receiver-centered; thus, robots may need to distinguish between good and bad handover orientations when learning from natural handovers.

AB - To enable robots to learn handover orientations from observing natural handovers, we conduct a user study to measure and compare natural handover orientations with giver-centered and receiver-centered handover orientations for twenty common objects. We use a distance minimization approach to compute mean handover orientations. We posit that, computed means of receiver-centered orientations could be used by robot givers to achieve more efficient and socially acceptable handovers. Furthermore, we introduce the notion of affordance axes for comparing handover orientations, and offer a definition for computing them. Observable patterns were found in receiver-centered handover orientations. Comparisons show that depending on the object, natural handover orientations may not be receiver-centered; thus, robots may need to distinguish between good and bad handover orientations when learning from natural handovers.

KW - Atmospheric measurements

KW - Collaboration

KW - Handover

KW - Particle measurements

KW - Receivers

KW - Robots

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84958175611&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/IROS.2015.7353106

DO - 10.1109/IROS.2015.7353106

M3 - Conference Paper

VL - 2015-December

SP - 1

EP - 6

BT - IROS Hamburg 2015 - Conference Digest

PB - IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

ER -

Chan WP, Pan MKXJ, Croft EA, Inaba M. Characterization of handover orientations used by humans for efficient robot to human handovers. In IROS Hamburg 2015 - Conference Digest: IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems. Vol. 2015-December. IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. 2015. p. 1-6. 7353106 https://doi.org/10.1109/IROS.2015.7353106