Cauli: a mouse strain with an Ift140 mutation that results in a skeletal ciliopathy modelling Jeune syndrome

Kerry A Miller, Casey J Ah-Cann, Megan F Welfare, Tiong Y Tan, Kate Pope, Georgina Caruana, Mary-Louise Freckmann, Ravi Savarirayan, John Frederick Bertram, Michael Serge Dobbie, John Francis Bateman, Peter Gordon Farlie

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27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cilia are architecturally complex organelles that protrude from the cell membrane and have signalling, sensory and motility functions that are central to normal tissue development and homeostasis. There are two broad categories of cilia; motile and non-motile, or primary, cilia. The central role of primary cilia in health and disease has become prominent in the past decade with the recognition of a number of human syndromes that result from defects in the formation or function of primary cilia. This rapidly growing class of conditions, now known as ciliopathies, impact the development of a diverse range of tissues including the neural axis, craniofacial structures, skeleton, kidneys, eyes and lungs. The broad impact of cilia dysfunction on development reflects the pivotal position of the primary cilia within a signalling nexus involving a growing number of growth factor systems including Hedgehog, Pdgf, Fgf, Hippo, Notch and both canonical Wnt and planar cell polarity. We have identified a novel ENU mutant allele of Ift140, which causes a mid-gestation embryonic lethal phenotype in homozygous mutant mice. Mutant embryos exhibit a range of phenotypes including exencephaly and spina bifida, craniofacial dysmorphism, digit anomalies, cardiac anomalies and somite patterning defects. A number of these phenotypes can be attributed to alterations in Hedgehog signalling, although additional signalling systems are also likely to be involved. We also report the identification of a homozygous recessive mutation in IFT140 in a Jeune syndrome patient. This ENU-induced Jeune syndrome model will be useful in delineating the origins of dysmorphology in human ciliopathies.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1003746
Number of pages15
JournalPLoS Genetics
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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