Caring for people with dementia in hospital

findings from a survey to identify barriers and facilitators to implementing best practice dementia care

Joanne Tropea, Dina LoGiudice, Danny Liew, Carol Roberts, Caroline Brand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:: Best practice dementia care is not always provided in the hospital setting. Knowledge, attitudes and motivation, practitioner behavior, and external factors can influence uptake of best practice and quality care. The aim of this study was to determine hospital staff perceived barriers and enablers to implementing best practice dementia care. Methods:: A 17-item survey was administered at two Australian hospitals between July and September 2014. Multidisciplinary staff working in the emergency departments and general medical wards were invited to participate in the survey. The survey collected data about the respondents’ current role, work area, and years of experience, their perceived level of confidence and knowledge in dementia care and common symptoms of dementia, barriers and enablers to implementing best practice dementia care, job satisfaction in caring for people with dementia, and to rate the hospital's capacity and available resources to support best practice dementia care. Results:: A total of 112 survey responses were received. The environment, inadequate staffing levels and workload, time, and staff knowledge and skills were identified as barriers to implementing best practice dementia care. Most respondents rated their knowledge of dementia care and common symptoms of dementia, and confidence in recognizing whether a person has dementia, as moderate or high dementia. Approximately, half the respondents rated access to training and equipment as low or very low. Conclusion:: The survey findings highlighted hospital staff perceived barriers to implementing best practice dementia care that can be used to inform locally tailored improvement interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)467 - 474
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Psychogeriatrics
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2017

Keywords

  • barriers
  • dementia
  • dementia care
  • hospital staff
  • knowledge
  • survey

Cite this

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Caring for people with dementia in hospital : findings from a survey to identify barriers and facilitators to implementing best practice dementia care. / Tropea, Joanne; LoGiudice, Dina; Liew, Danny; Roberts, Carol; Brand, Caroline.

In: International Psychogeriatrics, Vol. 29, No. 3, 03.2017, p. 467 - 474.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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