Cancer patients’ perceptions of palliative care

Benjamin Chosich, Marjorie Burgess, Arul Earnest, Michael Franco, Fiona Runacres, Leeroy William, Peter Poon, Jaclyn Yoong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Despite clear benefits of early integration of palliative care (PC) and oncology, concerns remain about negative perceptions of PC. Our aim was to explore current knowledge and perceptions of PC in cancer patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional survey. A 16-item questionnaire was distributed to all cancer patients (N = 103) upon admission to the oncology ward of an Australian tertiary academic hospital. Chi-squared test was used to examine for significant factors related to patients’ perceptions. Results: Ninety-six patients (93%) completed the questionnaire; 76% had metastatic cancer. We explored the following domains:Experience and knowledge: 76% had heard of PC; 21% had received PC. Self-rated PC knowledge was varied. Forty-five percent believed that PC was only associated with EOLC; those more likely to disagree had received PC services (p = 0.039).Integration of PC and oncology: Majority believed that they could receive oncology care (86%) and anti-cancer treatment (81%) whilst receiving PC. Those who had heard of PC and with better self-rated knowledge were more likely to believe that they could receive concurrent anti-cancer treatment (p = 0.005, p = 0.045, respectively).Feelings: 77% felt comforted with PC involvement; this was significantly associated with older age (p = 0.047) and understanding that oncology (p < 0.005) and anti-cancer treatment (p = 0.013) could continue. However, some felt frightened (40%) and hopeless (29%) about referral to PC. Fifty percent felt more comfortable with referral to ‘supportive care’ services (versus PC). Conclusions: Our survey demonstrates reasonable understanding and relatively positive feelings about PC, associated with experience and knowledge. Nonetheless, there is ongoing need for better patient and public education about PC.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 19 Jun 2019

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Integration
  • Palliative care
  • Perceptions

Cite this

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title = "Cancer patients’ perceptions of palliative care",
abstract = "Purpose: Despite clear benefits of early integration of palliative care (PC) and oncology, concerns remain about negative perceptions of PC. Our aim was to explore current knowledge and perceptions of PC in cancer patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional survey. A 16-item questionnaire was distributed to all cancer patients (N = 103) upon admission to the oncology ward of an Australian tertiary academic hospital. Chi-squared test was used to examine for significant factors related to patients’ perceptions. Results: Ninety-six patients (93{\%}) completed the questionnaire; 76{\%} had metastatic cancer. We explored the following domains:Experience and knowledge: 76{\%} had heard of PC; 21{\%} had received PC. Self-rated PC knowledge was varied. Forty-five percent believed that PC was only associated with EOLC; those more likely to disagree had received PC services (p = 0.039).Integration of PC and oncology: Majority believed that they could receive oncology care (86{\%}) and anti-cancer treatment (81{\%}) whilst receiving PC. Those who had heard of PC and with better self-rated knowledge were more likely to believe that they could receive concurrent anti-cancer treatment (p = 0.005, p = 0.045, respectively).Feelings: 77{\%} felt comforted with PC involvement; this was significantly associated with older age (p = 0.047) and understanding that oncology (p < 0.005) and anti-cancer treatment (p = 0.013) could continue. However, some felt frightened (40{\%}) and hopeless (29{\%}) about referral to PC. Fifty percent felt more comfortable with referral to ‘supportive care’ services (versus PC). Conclusions: Our survey demonstrates reasonable understanding and relatively positive feelings about PC, associated with experience and knowledge. Nonetheless, there is ongoing need for better patient and public education about PC.",
keywords = "Cancer, Integration, Palliative care, Perceptions",
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Cancer patients’ perceptions of palliative care. / Chosich, Benjamin; Burgess, Marjorie; Earnest, Arul; Franco, Michael; Runacres, Fiona; William, Leeroy; Poon, Peter; Yoong, Jaclyn.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, 19.06.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cancer patients’ perceptions of palliative care

AU - Chosich, Benjamin

AU - Burgess, Marjorie

AU - Earnest, Arul

AU - Franco, Michael

AU - Runacres, Fiona

AU - William, Leeroy

AU - Poon, Peter

AU - Yoong, Jaclyn

PY - 2019/6/19

Y1 - 2019/6/19

N2 - Purpose: Despite clear benefits of early integration of palliative care (PC) and oncology, concerns remain about negative perceptions of PC. Our aim was to explore current knowledge and perceptions of PC in cancer patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional survey. A 16-item questionnaire was distributed to all cancer patients (N = 103) upon admission to the oncology ward of an Australian tertiary academic hospital. Chi-squared test was used to examine for significant factors related to patients’ perceptions. Results: Ninety-six patients (93%) completed the questionnaire; 76% had metastatic cancer. We explored the following domains:Experience and knowledge: 76% had heard of PC; 21% had received PC. Self-rated PC knowledge was varied. Forty-five percent believed that PC was only associated with EOLC; those more likely to disagree had received PC services (p = 0.039).Integration of PC and oncology: Majority believed that they could receive oncology care (86%) and anti-cancer treatment (81%) whilst receiving PC. Those who had heard of PC and with better self-rated knowledge were more likely to believe that they could receive concurrent anti-cancer treatment (p = 0.005, p = 0.045, respectively).Feelings: 77% felt comforted with PC involvement; this was significantly associated with older age (p = 0.047) and understanding that oncology (p < 0.005) and anti-cancer treatment (p = 0.013) could continue. However, some felt frightened (40%) and hopeless (29%) about referral to PC. Fifty percent felt more comfortable with referral to ‘supportive care’ services (versus PC). Conclusions: Our survey demonstrates reasonable understanding and relatively positive feelings about PC, associated with experience and knowledge. Nonetheless, there is ongoing need for better patient and public education about PC.

AB - Purpose: Despite clear benefits of early integration of palliative care (PC) and oncology, concerns remain about negative perceptions of PC. Our aim was to explore current knowledge and perceptions of PC in cancer patients. Methods: We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional survey. A 16-item questionnaire was distributed to all cancer patients (N = 103) upon admission to the oncology ward of an Australian tertiary academic hospital. Chi-squared test was used to examine for significant factors related to patients’ perceptions. Results: Ninety-six patients (93%) completed the questionnaire; 76% had metastatic cancer. We explored the following domains:Experience and knowledge: 76% had heard of PC; 21% had received PC. Self-rated PC knowledge was varied. Forty-five percent believed that PC was only associated with EOLC; those more likely to disagree had received PC services (p = 0.039).Integration of PC and oncology: Majority believed that they could receive oncology care (86%) and anti-cancer treatment (81%) whilst receiving PC. Those who had heard of PC and with better self-rated knowledge were more likely to believe that they could receive concurrent anti-cancer treatment (p = 0.005, p = 0.045, respectively).Feelings: 77% felt comforted with PC involvement; this was significantly associated with older age (p = 0.047) and understanding that oncology (p < 0.005) and anti-cancer treatment (p = 0.013) could continue. However, some felt frightened (40%) and hopeless (29%) about referral to PC. Fifty percent felt more comfortable with referral to ‘supportive care’ services (versus PC). Conclusions: Our survey demonstrates reasonable understanding and relatively positive feelings about PC, associated with experience and knowledge. Nonetheless, there is ongoing need for better patient and public education about PC.

KW - Cancer

KW - Integration

KW - Palliative care

KW - Perceptions

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U2 - 10.1007/s00520-019-04917-8

DO - 10.1007/s00520-019-04917-8

M3 - Article

JO - Supportive Care in Cancer

JF - Supportive Care in Cancer

SN - 0941-4355

ER -