Camera control in computer graphics

Marc Christie, Patrick Olivier, Jean Marie Normand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Recent progress in modelling, animation and rendering means that rich, high fidelity virtual worlds are found in many interactive graphics applications. However, the viewer's experience of a 3D world is dependent on the nature of the virtual cinematography, in particular, the camera position, orientation and motion in relation to the elements of the scene and the action. Camera control encompasses viewpoint computation, motion planning and editing. We present a range of computer graphics applications and draw on insights from cinematographic practice in identifying their different requirements with regard to camera control. The nature of the camera control problem varies depending on these requirements, which range from augmented manual control (semi-automatic) in interactive applications, to fully automated approaches. We review the full range of solution techniques from constraint-based to optimization-based approaches, and conclude with an examination of occlusion management and expressiveness in the context of declarative approaches to camera control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2197-2218
Number of pages22
JournalComputer Graphics Forum
Volume27
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2008

Keywords

  • Camera planning
  • Virtual camera control
  • Virtual cinematography

Cite this

Christie, Marc ; Olivier, Patrick ; Normand, Jean Marie. / Camera control in computer graphics. In: Computer Graphics Forum. 2008 ; Vol. 27, No. 8. pp. 2197-2218.
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Camera control in computer graphics. / Christie, Marc; Olivier, Patrick; Normand, Jean Marie.

In: Computer Graphics Forum, Vol. 27, No. 8, 01.01.2008, p. 2197-2218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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