Calcium-vitamin D cosupplementation influences circulating inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient diabetics: A randomized controlled clinical trial

Maryam Tabesh, Leila Azadbakht, Elham Faghihimani, Marjan Tabesh, Ahmad Esmaillzadeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: To the best of our knowledge, no study has examined the effects of vitamin D-calcium cosupplementation on inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient type 2 diabetics. Objective: This study was performed to assess the effects of vitamin D and calcium supplementation on inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient people with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Totally, 118 diabetic patients were enrolled in this randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. After matching for age, sex, body mass index, type and dose of hypoglycemic agents, and duration of diabetes, subjects were randomly assigned into 4 groups receiving the following: 1) 50000 IU/wk vitamin D + calcium placebo; 2) 1000 mg/d calcium + vitamin D placebo; 3) 50 000 IU/wk vitamin D + 1000 mg/d calcium; or 4) vitamin D placebo + calcium placebo for 8 weeks. Blood sampling was done for the quantification of inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines at the study baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention. Results: Calcium (changes from baseline: -75±19 ng/ml, P = .01) and vitamin D alone (-56 ± 19 ng/mL, P = .01) and joint calcium-vitamin D supplementation (-92 ± 19 ng/mL, P = .01) resulted in a significant reduction in serum leptin levels compared with placebo (-9 ± 18 ng/mL). This was also the case for serum IL-6, such that calcium (-2 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) and vitamin D alone (-4 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) and their combination (-4 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) led to significant reductions compared with placebo (3 ± 1 pg/mL). After adjustment for potential confounders, individuals in the calcium (-3.1 ± 1.3, P < .05), vitamin D (-3.1 ± 1.3, P < .05), and joint calcium-vitamin D groups (-3.4 ± 1.3, P < .05) had greater reductions in serum TNF-α concentrations compared with placebo (0.1 ± 1.2). Individuals who received joint calcium-vitamin D supplements tended to have a decrease in serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels compared with placebo after controlling for baseline levels (-1.14 ± 0.25 vs 0.02 ± 0.24 ng/mL, P = .09). Conclusion: Joint calcium-vitamin D supplementation might improve systemic inflammation through decreasing IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations in vitamin D-insufficient people with type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E2485-E2493
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metablism
Volume99
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2014
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

@article{4dd70b4dc6e045149943f78192308d0e,
title = "Calcium-vitamin D cosupplementation influences circulating inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient diabetics: A randomized controlled clinical trial",
abstract = "Context: To the best of our knowledge, no study has examined the effects of vitamin D-calcium cosupplementation on inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient type 2 diabetics. Objective: This study was performed to assess the effects of vitamin D and calcium supplementation on inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient people with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Totally, 118 diabetic patients were enrolled in this randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. After matching for age, sex, body mass index, type and dose of hypoglycemic agents, and duration of diabetes, subjects were randomly assigned into 4 groups receiving the following: 1) 50000 IU/wk vitamin D + calcium placebo; 2) 1000 mg/d calcium + vitamin D placebo; 3) 50 000 IU/wk vitamin D + 1000 mg/d calcium; or 4) vitamin D placebo + calcium placebo for 8 weeks. Blood sampling was done for the quantification of inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines at the study baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention. Results: Calcium (changes from baseline: -75±19 ng/ml, P = .01) and vitamin D alone (-56 ± 19 ng/mL, P = .01) and joint calcium-vitamin D supplementation (-92 ± 19 ng/mL, P = .01) resulted in a significant reduction in serum leptin levels compared with placebo (-9 ± 18 ng/mL). This was also the case for serum IL-6, such that calcium (-2 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) and vitamin D alone (-4 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) and their combination (-4 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) led to significant reductions compared with placebo (3 ± 1 pg/mL). After adjustment for potential confounders, individuals in the calcium (-3.1 ± 1.3, P < .05), vitamin D (-3.1 ± 1.3, P < .05), and joint calcium-vitamin D groups (-3.4 ± 1.3, P < .05) had greater reductions in serum TNF-α concentrations compared with placebo (0.1 ± 1.2). Individuals who received joint calcium-vitamin D supplements tended to have a decrease in serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels compared with placebo after controlling for baseline levels (-1.14 ± 0.25 vs 0.02 ± 0.24 ng/mL, P = .09). Conclusion: Joint calcium-vitamin D supplementation might improve systemic inflammation through decreasing IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations in vitamin D-insufficient people with type 2 diabetes.",
author = "Maryam Tabesh and Leila Azadbakht and Elham Faghihimani and Marjan Tabesh and Ahmad Esmaillzadeh",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1210/jc.2014-1977",
language = "English",
volume = "99",
pages = "E2485--E2493",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metablism",
issn = "0021-972X",
publisher = "The Endocrine Society",
number = "12",

}

Calcium-vitamin D cosupplementation influences circulating inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient diabetics : A randomized controlled clinical trial. / Tabesh, Maryam; Azadbakht, Leila; Faghihimani, Elham; Tabesh, Marjan; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metablism, Vol. 99, No. 12, 01.12.2014, p. E2485-E2493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Calcium-vitamin D cosupplementation influences circulating inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient diabetics

T2 - A randomized controlled clinical trial

AU - Tabesh, Maryam

AU - Azadbakht, Leila

AU - Faghihimani, Elham

AU - Tabesh, Marjan

AU - Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

PY - 2014/12/1

Y1 - 2014/12/1

N2 - Context: To the best of our knowledge, no study has examined the effects of vitamin D-calcium cosupplementation on inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient type 2 diabetics. Objective: This study was performed to assess the effects of vitamin D and calcium supplementation on inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient people with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Totally, 118 diabetic patients were enrolled in this randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. After matching for age, sex, body mass index, type and dose of hypoglycemic agents, and duration of diabetes, subjects were randomly assigned into 4 groups receiving the following: 1) 50000 IU/wk vitamin D + calcium placebo; 2) 1000 mg/d calcium + vitamin D placebo; 3) 50 000 IU/wk vitamin D + 1000 mg/d calcium; or 4) vitamin D placebo + calcium placebo for 8 weeks. Blood sampling was done for the quantification of inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines at the study baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention. Results: Calcium (changes from baseline: -75±19 ng/ml, P = .01) and vitamin D alone (-56 ± 19 ng/mL, P = .01) and joint calcium-vitamin D supplementation (-92 ± 19 ng/mL, P = .01) resulted in a significant reduction in serum leptin levels compared with placebo (-9 ± 18 ng/mL). This was also the case for serum IL-6, such that calcium (-2 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) and vitamin D alone (-4 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) and their combination (-4 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) led to significant reductions compared with placebo (3 ± 1 pg/mL). After adjustment for potential confounders, individuals in the calcium (-3.1 ± 1.3, P < .05), vitamin D (-3.1 ± 1.3, P < .05), and joint calcium-vitamin D groups (-3.4 ± 1.3, P < .05) had greater reductions in serum TNF-α concentrations compared with placebo (0.1 ± 1.2). Individuals who received joint calcium-vitamin D supplements tended to have a decrease in serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels compared with placebo after controlling for baseline levels (-1.14 ± 0.25 vs 0.02 ± 0.24 ng/mL, P = .09). Conclusion: Joint calcium-vitamin D supplementation might improve systemic inflammation through decreasing IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations in vitamin D-insufficient people with type 2 diabetes.

AB - Context: To the best of our knowledge, no study has examined the effects of vitamin D-calcium cosupplementation on inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient type 2 diabetics. Objective: This study was performed to assess the effects of vitamin D and calcium supplementation on inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines in vitamin D-insufficient people with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Totally, 118 diabetic patients were enrolled in this randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. After matching for age, sex, body mass index, type and dose of hypoglycemic agents, and duration of diabetes, subjects were randomly assigned into 4 groups receiving the following: 1) 50000 IU/wk vitamin D + calcium placebo; 2) 1000 mg/d calcium + vitamin D placebo; 3) 50 000 IU/wk vitamin D + 1000 mg/d calcium; or 4) vitamin D placebo + calcium placebo for 8 weeks. Blood sampling was done for the quantification of inflammatory biomarkers and adipocytokines at the study baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention. Results: Calcium (changes from baseline: -75±19 ng/ml, P = .01) and vitamin D alone (-56 ± 19 ng/mL, P = .01) and joint calcium-vitamin D supplementation (-92 ± 19 ng/mL, P = .01) resulted in a significant reduction in serum leptin levels compared with placebo (-9 ± 18 ng/mL). This was also the case for serum IL-6, such that calcium (-2 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) and vitamin D alone (-4 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) and their combination (-4 ± 1 pg/mL, P < .001) led to significant reductions compared with placebo (3 ± 1 pg/mL). After adjustment for potential confounders, individuals in the calcium (-3.1 ± 1.3, P < .05), vitamin D (-3.1 ± 1.3, P < .05), and joint calcium-vitamin D groups (-3.4 ± 1.3, P < .05) had greater reductions in serum TNF-α concentrations compared with placebo (0.1 ± 1.2). Individuals who received joint calcium-vitamin D supplements tended to have a decrease in serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels compared with placebo after controlling for baseline levels (-1.14 ± 0.25 vs 0.02 ± 0.24 ng/mL, P = .09). Conclusion: Joint calcium-vitamin D supplementation might improve systemic inflammation through decreasing IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations in vitamin D-insufficient people with type 2 diabetes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84916641349&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1210/jc.2014-1977

DO - 10.1210/jc.2014-1977

M3 - Article

C2 - 25215557

AN - SCOPUS:84916641349

VL - 99

SP - E2485-E2493

JO - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metablism

JF - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metablism

SN - 0021-972X

IS - 12

ER -