Caffeine for apnea of prematurity and brain development at 11 years of age

Claire E. Kelly, Wenn Lynn Ooi, Joseph Yuan Mou Yang, Jian Chen, Chris Adamson, Katherine J. Lee, Jeanie L.Y. Cheong, Peter J. Anderson, Lex W. Doyle, Deanne K. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Caffeine therapy for apnea of prematurity has been reported to improve brain white matter microstructure at term-equivalent age, but its long-term effects are unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether caffeine affects (1) brain structure at 11 years of age, and (2) brain development from term-equivalent age to 11 years of age, compared with placebo. Methods: Preterm infants born ≤1250 g were randomly allocated to caffeine or placebo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 70 participants (33 caffeine, 37 placebo) at term-equivalent age and 117 participants (63 caffeine, 54 placebo) at 11 years of age. Global and regional brain volumes and white matter microstructure were measured at both time points. Results: In general, there was little evidence for differences between treatment groups in brain volumes or white matter microstructure at age 11 years. There was, however, evidence that the caffeine group had a smaller corpus callosum than the placebo group. Volumetric brain development from term-equivalent to 11 years of age was generally similar between treatment groups. However, there was evidence that caffeine was associated with slower growth of the corpus callosum, and slower decreases in axial, radial, and mean diffusivities in the white matter, particularly at the level of the centrum semiovale, over time than placebo. Interpretation: This study suggests any benefits of neonatal caffeine therapy on brain structure in preterm infants weaken over time and are not clearly detectable by MRI at age 11 years, although caffeine may have long-term effects on corpus callosum development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1112-1127
Number of pages16
JournalAnnals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
Volume5
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

Cite this

Kelly, C. E., Ooi, W. L., Yang, J. Y. M., Chen, J., Adamson, C., Lee, K. J., ... Thompson, D. K. (2018). Caffeine for apnea of prematurity and brain development at 11 years of age. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, 5(9), 1112-1127. https://doi.org/10.1002/acn3.628
Kelly, Claire E. ; Ooi, Wenn Lynn ; Yang, Joseph Yuan Mou ; Chen, Jian ; Adamson, Chris ; Lee, Katherine J. ; Cheong, Jeanie L.Y. ; Anderson, Peter J. ; Doyle, Lex W. ; Thompson, Deanne K. / Caffeine for apnea of prematurity and brain development at 11 years of age. In: Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology. 2018 ; Vol. 5, No. 9. pp. 1112-1127.
@article{59297308bd1c40be8f6fb40c938ce6bc,
title = "Caffeine for apnea of prematurity and brain development at 11 years of age",
abstract = "Objective: Caffeine therapy for apnea of prematurity has been reported to improve brain white matter microstructure at term-equivalent age, but its long-term effects are unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether caffeine affects (1) brain structure at 11 years of age, and (2) brain development from term-equivalent age to 11 years of age, compared with placebo. Methods: Preterm infants born ≤1250 g were randomly allocated to caffeine or placebo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 70 participants (33 caffeine, 37 placebo) at term-equivalent age and 117 participants (63 caffeine, 54 placebo) at 11 years of age. Global and regional brain volumes and white matter microstructure were measured at both time points. Results: In general, there was little evidence for differences between treatment groups in brain volumes or white matter microstructure at age 11 years. There was, however, evidence that the caffeine group had a smaller corpus callosum than the placebo group. Volumetric brain development from term-equivalent to 11 years of age was generally similar between treatment groups. However, there was evidence that caffeine was associated with slower growth of the corpus callosum, and slower decreases in axial, radial, and mean diffusivities in the white matter, particularly at the level of the centrum semiovale, over time than placebo. Interpretation: This study suggests any benefits of neonatal caffeine therapy on brain structure in preterm infants weaken over time and are not clearly detectable by MRI at age 11 years, although caffeine may have long-term effects on corpus callosum development.",
author = "Kelly, {Claire E.} and Ooi, {Wenn Lynn} and Yang, {Joseph Yuan Mou} and Jian Chen and Chris Adamson and Lee, {Katherine J.} and Cheong, {Jeanie L.Y.} and Anderson, {Peter J.} and Doyle, {Lex W.} and Thompson, {Deanne K.}",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/acn3.628",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "1112--1127",
journal = "Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology",
issn = "2328-9503",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "9",

}

Kelly, CE, Ooi, WL, Yang, JYM, Chen, J, Adamson, C, Lee, KJ, Cheong, JLY, Anderson, PJ, Doyle, LW & Thompson, DK 2018, 'Caffeine for apnea of prematurity and brain development at 11 years of age' Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, vol. 5, no. 9, pp. 1112-1127. https://doi.org/10.1002/acn3.628

Caffeine for apnea of prematurity and brain development at 11 years of age. / Kelly, Claire E.; Ooi, Wenn Lynn; Yang, Joseph Yuan Mou; Chen, Jian; Adamson, Chris; Lee, Katherine J.; Cheong, Jeanie L.Y.; Anderson, Peter J.; Doyle, Lex W.; Thompson, Deanne K.

In: Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, Vol. 5, No. 9, 01.09.2018, p. 1112-1127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Caffeine for apnea of prematurity and brain development at 11 years of age

AU - Kelly, Claire E.

AU - Ooi, Wenn Lynn

AU - Yang, Joseph Yuan Mou

AU - Chen, Jian

AU - Adamson, Chris

AU - Lee, Katherine J.

AU - Cheong, Jeanie L.Y.

AU - Anderson, Peter J.

AU - Doyle, Lex W.

AU - Thompson, Deanne K.

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - Objective: Caffeine therapy for apnea of prematurity has been reported to improve brain white matter microstructure at term-equivalent age, but its long-term effects are unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether caffeine affects (1) brain structure at 11 years of age, and (2) brain development from term-equivalent age to 11 years of age, compared with placebo. Methods: Preterm infants born ≤1250 g were randomly allocated to caffeine or placebo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 70 participants (33 caffeine, 37 placebo) at term-equivalent age and 117 participants (63 caffeine, 54 placebo) at 11 years of age. Global and regional brain volumes and white matter microstructure were measured at both time points. Results: In general, there was little evidence for differences between treatment groups in brain volumes or white matter microstructure at age 11 years. There was, however, evidence that the caffeine group had a smaller corpus callosum than the placebo group. Volumetric brain development from term-equivalent to 11 years of age was generally similar between treatment groups. However, there was evidence that caffeine was associated with slower growth of the corpus callosum, and slower decreases in axial, radial, and mean diffusivities in the white matter, particularly at the level of the centrum semiovale, over time than placebo. Interpretation: This study suggests any benefits of neonatal caffeine therapy on brain structure in preterm infants weaken over time and are not clearly detectable by MRI at age 11 years, although caffeine may have long-term effects on corpus callosum development.

AB - Objective: Caffeine therapy for apnea of prematurity has been reported to improve brain white matter microstructure at term-equivalent age, but its long-term effects are unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether caffeine affects (1) brain structure at 11 years of age, and (2) brain development from term-equivalent age to 11 years of age, compared with placebo. Methods: Preterm infants born ≤1250 g were randomly allocated to caffeine or placebo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 70 participants (33 caffeine, 37 placebo) at term-equivalent age and 117 participants (63 caffeine, 54 placebo) at 11 years of age. Global and regional brain volumes and white matter microstructure were measured at both time points. Results: In general, there was little evidence for differences between treatment groups in brain volumes or white matter microstructure at age 11 years. There was, however, evidence that the caffeine group had a smaller corpus callosum than the placebo group. Volumetric brain development from term-equivalent to 11 years of age was generally similar between treatment groups. However, there was evidence that caffeine was associated with slower growth of the corpus callosum, and slower decreases in axial, radial, and mean diffusivities in the white matter, particularly at the level of the centrum semiovale, over time than placebo. Interpretation: This study suggests any benefits of neonatal caffeine therapy on brain structure in preterm infants weaken over time and are not clearly detectable by MRI at age 11 years, although caffeine may have long-term effects on corpus callosum development.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053479284&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/acn3.628

DO - 10.1002/acn3.628

M3 - Article

VL - 5

SP - 1112

EP - 1127

JO - Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology

JF - Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology

SN - 2328-9503

IS - 9

ER -