Bronchiectasis in indigenous and non-indigenous residents of Australia and New Zealand

Sean R. Blackall, Jae B. Hong, Paul King, Conroy Wong, Lloyd Einsiedel, Marc G.W. Rémond, Cindy Woods, Graeme P. Maguire

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objective: Bronchiectasis not associated with cystic fibrosis is an increasingly recognized chronic lung disease. In Oceania, indigenous populations experience a disproportionately high burden of disease. We aimed to describe the natural history of bronchiectasis and identify risk factors associated with premature mortality within a cohort of Aboriginal Australians, New Zealand Māori and Pacific Islanders, and non-indigenous Australians and New Zealanders. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of bronchiectasis patients aged >15 years at three hospitals: Alice Springs Hospital and Monash Medical Centre in Australia, and Middlemore Hospital in New Zealand. Data included demographics, ethnicity, sputum microbiology, radiology, spirometry, hospitalization and survival over 5 years of follow-up. Results: Aboriginal Australians were significantly younger and died at a significantly younger age than other groups. Age- and sex-adjusted all-cause mortality was higher for Aboriginal Australians (hazard ratio (HR): 3.9), and respiratory-related mortality was higher for both Aboriginal Australians (HR: 4.3) and Māori and Pacific Islander people (HR: 1.7). Hospitalization was common: Aboriginal Australians had 2.9 admissions/person-year and 16.9 days in hospital/person-year. Despite Aboriginal Australians having poorer prognosis, calculation of the FACED score suggested milder disease in this group. Sputum microbiology varied with Aspergillus fumigatus more often isolated from non-indigenous patients. Airflow obstruction was common (66.9%) but not invariable. Conclusions: Bronchiectasis is not one disease. It has a significant impact on healthcare utilization and survival. Differences between populations are likely to relate to differing aetiologies and understanding the drivers of bronchiectasis in disadvantaged populations will be key.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)743-749
Number of pages7
JournalRespirology
Volume23
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • bronchiectasis
  • hospitalization
  • Oceania
  • premature mortality
  • survival analysis

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