Breast milk feeding, brain development, and neurocognitive outcomes: A 7-year longitudinal study in infants born at less than 30 weeks' gestation

Mandy B. Belfort, Peter J. Anderson, Victoria A. Nowak, Katherine J. Lee, Charlotte Molesworth, Deanne K. Thompson, Lex W. Doyle, Terrie E. Inder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives To determine the associations of breast milk intake after birth with neurological outcomes at term equivalent and 7 years of age in very preterm infants Study design We studied 180 infants born at <30 weeks' gestation or <1250 grams birth weight enrolled in the Victorian Infant Brain Studies cohort from 2001-2003. We calculated the number of days on which infants received >50% of enteral intake as breast milk from 0-28 days of life. Outcomes included brain volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging at term equivalent and 7 years of age, and cognitive (IQ, reading, mathematics, attention, working memory, language, visual perception) and motor testing at 7 years of age. We adjusted for age, sex, social risk, and neonatal illness in linear regression. Results A greater number of days on which infants received >50% breast milk was associated with greater deep nuclear gray matter volume at term equivalent age (0.15 cc/d; 95% CI, 0.05-0.25); and with better performance at age 7 years of age on IQ (0.5 points/d; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8), mathematics (0.5; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9), working memory (0.5; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9), and motor function (0.1; 95% CI, 0.0-0.2) tests. No differences in regional brain volumes at 7 years of age in relation to breast milk intake were observed. Conclusion Predominant breast milk feeding in the first 28 days of life was associated with a greater deep nuclear gray matter volume at term equivalent age and better IQ, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function at 7 years of age in very preterm infants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-139
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume177
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • academic achievement
  • intelligence
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • memory
  • preterm infant

Cite this

Belfort, Mandy B. ; Anderson, Peter J. ; Nowak, Victoria A. ; Lee, Katherine J. ; Molesworth, Charlotte ; Thompson, Deanne K. ; Doyle, Lex W. ; Inder, Terrie E. / Breast milk feeding, brain development, and neurocognitive outcomes : A 7-year longitudinal study in infants born at less than 30 weeks' gestation. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2016 ; Vol. 177. pp. 133-139.
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title = "Breast milk feeding, brain development, and neurocognitive outcomes: A 7-year longitudinal study in infants born at less than 30 weeks' gestation",
abstract = "Objectives To determine the associations of breast milk intake after birth with neurological outcomes at term equivalent and 7 years of age in very preterm infants Study design We studied 180 infants born at <30 weeks' gestation or <1250 grams birth weight enrolled in the Victorian Infant Brain Studies cohort from 2001-2003. We calculated the number of days on which infants received >50{\%} of enteral intake as breast milk from 0-28 days of life. Outcomes included brain volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging at term equivalent and 7 years of age, and cognitive (IQ, reading, mathematics, attention, working memory, language, visual perception) and motor testing at 7 years of age. We adjusted for age, sex, social risk, and neonatal illness in linear regression. Results A greater number of days on which infants received >50{\%} breast milk was associated with greater deep nuclear gray matter volume at term equivalent age (0.15 cc/d; 95{\%} CI, 0.05-0.25); and with better performance at age 7 years of age on IQ (0.5 points/d; 95{\%} CI, 0.2-0.8), mathematics (0.5; 95{\%} CI, 0.1-0.9), working memory (0.5; 95{\%} CI, 0.1-0.9), and motor function (0.1; 95{\%} CI, 0.0-0.2) tests. No differences in regional brain volumes at 7 years of age in relation to breast milk intake were observed. Conclusion Predominant breast milk feeding in the first 28 days of life was associated with a greater deep nuclear gray matter volume at term equivalent age and better IQ, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function at 7 years of age in very preterm infants.",
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author = "Belfort, {Mandy B.} and Anderson, {Peter J.} and Nowak, {Victoria A.} and Lee, {Katherine J.} and Charlotte Molesworth and Thompson, {Deanne K.} and Doyle, {Lex W.} and Inder, {Terrie E.}",
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Breast milk feeding, brain development, and neurocognitive outcomes : A 7-year longitudinal study in infants born at less than 30 weeks' gestation. / Belfort, Mandy B.; Anderson, Peter J.; Nowak, Victoria A.; Lee, Katherine J.; Molesworth, Charlotte; Thompson, Deanne K.; Doyle, Lex W.; Inder, Terrie E.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 177, 10.2016, p. 133-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Belfort, Mandy B.

AU - Anderson, Peter J.

AU - Nowak, Victoria A.

AU - Lee, Katherine J.

AU - Molesworth, Charlotte

AU - Thompson, Deanne K.

AU - Doyle, Lex W.

AU - Inder, Terrie E.

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N2 - Objectives To determine the associations of breast milk intake after birth with neurological outcomes at term equivalent and 7 years of age in very preterm infants Study design We studied 180 infants born at <30 weeks' gestation or <1250 grams birth weight enrolled in the Victorian Infant Brain Studies cohort from 2001-2003. We calculated the number of days on which infants received >50% of enteral intake as breast milk from 0-28 days of life. Outcomes included brain volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging at term equivalent and 7 years of age, and cognitive (IQ, reading, mathematics, attention, working memory, language, visual perception) and motor testing at 7 years of age. We adjusted for age, sex, social risk, and neonatal illness in linear regression. Results A greater number of days on which infants received >50% breast milk was associated with greater deep nuclear gray matter volume at term equivalent age (0.15 cc/d; 95% CI, 0.05-0.25); and with better performance at age 7 years of age on IQ (0.5 points/d; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8), mathematics (0.5; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9), working memory (0.5; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9), and motor function (0.1; 95% CI, 0.0-0.2) tests. No differences in regional brain volumes at 7 years of age in relation to breast milk intake were observed. Conclusion Predominant breast milk feeding in the first 28 days of life was associated with a greater deep nuclear gray matter volume at term equivalent age and better IQ, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function at 7 years of age in very preterm infants.

AB - Objectives To determine the associations of breast milk intake after birth with neurological outcomes at term equivalent and 7 years of age in very preterm infants Study design We studied 180 infants born at <30 weeks' gestation or <1250 grams birth weight enrolled in the Victorian Infant Brain Studies cohort from 2001-2003. We calculated the number of days on which infants received >50% of enteral intake as breast milk from 0-28 days of life. Outcomes included brain volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging at term equivalent and 7 years of age, and cognitive (IQ, reading, mathematics, attention, working memory, language, visual perception) and motor testing at 7 years of age. We adjusted for age, sex, social risk, and neonatal illness in linear regression. Results A greater number of days on which infants received >50% breast milk was associated with greater deep nuclear gray matter volume at term equivalent age (0.15 cc/d; 95% CI, 0.05-0.25); and with better performance at age 7 years of age on IQ (0.5 points/d; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8), mathematics (0.5; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9), working memory (0.5; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9), and motor function (0.1; 95% CI, 0.0-0.2) tests. No differences in regional brain volumes at 7 years of age in relation to breast milk intake were observed. Conclusion Predominant breast milk feeding in the first 28 days of life was associated with a greater deep nuclear gray matter volume at term equivalent age and better IQ, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function at 7 years of age in very preterm infants.

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