Brain circuitry in ageing and neurodegenerative disease

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Otherpeer-review

Abstract

As we age, our bodies undergo widespread and significant changes. Our hair greys and becomes thinner, our skin wrinkles, our eyesight and hearing become worse. Many people experience changes in their thinking as they get older, finding it more difficult to remember events and solve complex problems. It is not all doom and gloom for older people, however: older people have accumulated knowledge to help them solve many problems that may strike younger people as novel and complex (Salthouse, 2012); and many older people report a positive quality of life (Farquhar, 1995). Being retired, volunteer work, and social relationships with children, family and friends all have a positive impact on the older person’s life (Netuveli, Wiggins, Hildon, Montgomery & Blane, 2006).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDegenerative Disorders of the Brain
EditorsDarren R. Hocking, John L. Bradshaw, Joanne Fielding
Place of PublicationOxon, UK
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter1
Pages1-31
Number of pages31
ISBN (Electronic)9781351208918
ISBN (Print)9780815382249, 9780815382263
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Apr 2019

Cite this

Jamadar, S. (2019). Brain circuitry in ageing and neurodegenerative disease. In D. R. Hocking, J. L. Bradshaw, & J. Fielding (Eds.), Degenerative Disorders of the Brain (pp. 1-31). Oxon, UK: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351208918
Jamadar, Sharna. / Brain circuitry in ageing and neurodegenerative disease. Degenerative Disorders of the Brain. editor / Darren R. Hocking ; John L. Bradshaw ; Joanne Fielding. Oxon, UK : Routledge, 2019. pp. 1-31
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Jamadar, S 2019, Brain circuitry in ageing and neurodegenerative disease. in DR Hocking, JL Bradshaw & J Fielding (eds), Degenerative Disorders of the Brain. Routledge, Oxon, UK, pp. 1-31. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351208918

Brain circuitry in ageing and neurodegenerative disease. / Jamadar, Sharna.

Degenerative Disorders of the Brain. ed. / Darren R. Hocking; John L. Bradshaw; Joanne Fielding. Oxon, UK : Routledge, 2019. p. 1-31.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Otherpeer-review

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Jamadar S. Brain circuitry in ageing and neurodegenerative disease. In Hocking DR, Bradshaw JL, Fielding J, editors, Degenerative Disorders of the Brain. Oxon, UK: Routledge. 2019. p. 1-31 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351208918