Body weight change is unpredictable after total thyroidectomy

Ron Glick, Paula Chang, Peter Michail, Jonathan W. Serpell, Simon Grodski, James C. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There is a common perception that total thyroidectomy causes weight gain beyond expected age-related changes, even when thyroid replacement therapy induces a euthyroid state. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for a wide spectrum of conditions experienced weight gain following surgery. Methods: We retrospectively studied 107 consecutive total thyroidectomy patients treated between January 2013 and June 2014. Medical records were reviewed to determine underlying pathology, thyroid status, use of antithyroid drugs and preoperative weight. Follow-up data were obtained from 79 patients at least 10 months post-operatively to determine current weight, the type of clinician managing thyroid replacement therapy and patient satisfaction with post-thyroidectomy management. Results: The cohort was 73% female, with a mean age of 55.8 ± 15.7 years and a mean preoperative weight of 78.8 ± 17.5 kg. Commonest pathologies were multinodular goitre, Graves' disease, thyroid cancer and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Preoperatively, 63.2% of patients were hyperthyroid. Mean weight change at follow-up was a non-significant increase of 0.06 ± 6.9 kg (P = 0.094). Weight change was not significant regardless of preoperative thyroid function status. This study did not demonstrate any significant differences in clinical characteristics (including post-operative thyroid-stimulating hormone) between the group with >2% weight gain and those who did not. Conclusions: This study did not reveal significant weight gain following thyroidectomy for a wide spectrum of pathologies. Specifically, preoperative hyperthyroidism, female gender and use of antithyroid medications do not predict weight gain after thyroid surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-166
Number of pages5
JournalANZ Journal of Surgery
Volume88
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • body weight
  • endocrine surgery
  • general surgery
  • thyroidectomy

Cite this

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title = "Body weight change is unpredictable after total thyroidectomy",
abstract = "Background: There is a common perception that total thyroidectomy causes weight gain beyond expected age-related changes, even when thyroid replacement therapy induces a euthyroid state. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for a wide spectrum of conditions experienced weight gain following surgery. Methods: We retrospectively studied 107 consecutive total thyroidectomy patients treated between January 2013 and June 2014. Medical records were reviewed to determine underlying pathology, thyroid status, use of antithyroid drugs and preoperative weight. Follow-up data were obtained from 79 patients at least 10 months post-operatively to determine current weight, the type of clinician managing thyroid replacement therapy and patient satisfaction with post-thyroidectomy management. Results: The cohort was 73{\%} female, with a mean age of 55.8 ± 15.7 years and a mean preoperative weight of 78.8 ± 17.5 kg. Commonest pathologies were multinodular goitre, Graves' disease, thyroid cancer and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Preoperatively, 63.2{\%} of patients were hyperthyroid. Mean weight change at follow-up was a non-significant increase of 0.06 ± 6.9 kg (P = 0.094). Weight change was not significant regardless of preoperative thyroid function status. This study did not demonstrate any significant differences in clinical characteristics (including post-operative thyroid-stimulating hormone) between the group with >2{\%} weight gain and those who did not. Conclusions: This study did not reveal significant weight gain following thyroidectomy for a wide spectrum of pathologies. Specifically, preoperative hyperthyroidism, female gender and use of antithyroid medications do not predict weight gain after thyroid surgery.",
keywords = "body weight, endocrine surgery, general surgery, thyroidectomy",
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Body weight change is unpredictable after total thyroidectomy. / Glick, Ron; Chang, Paula; Michail, Peter; Serpell, Jonathan W.; Grodski, Simon; Lee, James C.

In: ANZ Journal of Surgery, Vol. 88, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 162-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Body weight change is unpredictable after total thyroidectomy

AU - Glick, Ron

AU - Chang, Paula

AU - Michail, Peter

AU - Serpell, Jonathan W.

AU - Grodski, Simon

AU - Lee, James C.

PY - 2018/3/1

Y1 - 2018/3/1

N2 - Background: There is a common perception that total thyroidectomy causes weight gain beyond expected age-related changes, even when thyroid replacement therapy induces a euthyroid state. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for a wide spectrum of conditions experienced weight gain following surgery. Methods: We retrospectively studied 107 consecutive total thyroidectomy patients treated between January 2013 and June 2014. Medical records were reviewed to determine underlying pathology, thyroid status, use of antithyroid drugs and preoperative weight. Follow-up data were obtained from 79 patients at least 10 months post-operatively to determine current weight, the type of clinician managing thyroid replacement therapy and patient satisfaction with post-thyroidectomy management. Results: The cohort was 73% female, with a mean age of 55.8 ± 15.7 years and a mean preoperative weight of 78.8 ± 17.5 kg. Commonest pathologies were multinodular goitre, Graves' disease, thyroid cancer and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Preoperatively, 63.2% of patients were hyperthyroid. Mean weight change at follow-up was a non-significant increase of 0.06 ± 6.9 kg (P = 0.094). Weight change was not significant regardless of preoperative thyroid function status. This study did not demonstrate any significant differences in clinical characteristics (including post-operative thyroid-stimulating hormone) between the group with >2% weight gain and those who did not. Conclusions: This study did not reveal significant weight gain following thyroidectomy for a wide spectrum of pathologies. Specifically, preoperative hyperthyroidism, female gender and use of antithyroid medications do not predict weight gain after thyroid surgery.

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KW - endocrine surgery

KW - general surgery

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U2 - 10.1111/ans.14421

DO - 10.1111/ans.14421

M3 - Article

VL - 88

SP - 162

EP - 166

JO - ANZ Journal of Surgery

JF - ANZ Journal of Surgery

SN - 1445-1433

IS - 3

ER -