Blood pressure and risk of breast cancer, overall and by subtypes

a prospective cohort study

Yi Yang, Brigid M. Lynch, Allison M. Hodge, Danny Liew, Catriona A. Mclean, Mathias Seviiri, Melissa Caroline Southey, John L. Hopper, Dallas R. English, Graham G. Giles, Roger L Milne, Pierre Antoine Dugué

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:: Blood pressure (BP) and breast cancer may share a common pathophysiologic pathway involving chronic inflammation, hormone synthesis and metabolism. Previous studies investigating the association between BP and breast cancer measured BP at a single time point and did not examine associations by breast cancer molecular subtypes. METHODS:: We used data from 22?833 female participants in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. BP was objectively measured at baseline (1990–1994) and a follow-up visit (2003–2007). Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for baseline BP and temporal changes in BP in relation to risk of breast cancer, overall and by molecular subtypes. RESULTS:: We did not observe any associations between BP measured at baseline and breast cancer risk overall (per 5?mmHg SBP, hazard ratio?=?1.00, 95% confidence interval: 0.99–1.02), nor by subtype (per 5?mmHg SBP: estrogen-receptor-negative: hazard ratio?=?0.99, 0.96–1.03, progesterone-receptor-negative: hazard ratio?=?1.01, 0.99–1.04, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative: hazard ratio?=?1.00, 0.98–1.01). Temporal changes in BP were not associated with risk of breast cancer (per 5?mmHg change in SBP, hazard ratio?=?1.00, 0.97–1.03). Increased DBP over time was associated with higher risk of triple-negative breast cancer (P?=?0.04), based on a small number of cases (N?=?41). CONCLUSION:: Our study supports previous findings of no association between BP and breast cancer. Similar conclusions were reached when assessing BP over time and when examining specific tumor subtypes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1371-1380
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume35
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

Cite this

@article{c699f0815653459e967906a8e6a15629,
title = "Blood pressure and risk of breast cancer, overall and by subtypes: a prospective cohort study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE:: Blood pressure (BP) and breast cancer may share a common pathophysiologic pathway involving chronic inflammation, hormone synthesis and metabolism. Previous studies investigating the association between BP and breast cancer measured BP at a single time point and did not examine associations by breast cancer molecular subtypes. METHODS:: We used data from 22?833 female participants in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. BP was objectively measured at baseline (1990–1994) and a follow-up visit (2003–2007). Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for baseline BP and temporal changes in BP in relation to risk of breast cancer, overall and by molecular subtypes. RESULTS:: We did not observe any associations between BP measured at baseline and breast cancer risk overall (per 5?mmHg SBP, hazard ratio?=?1.00, 95{\%} confidence interval: 0.99–1.02), nor by subtype (per 5?mmHg SBP: estrogen-receptor-negative: hazard ratio?=?0.99, 0.96–1.03, progesterone-receptor-negative: hazard ratio?=?1.01, 0.99–1.04, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative: hazard ratio?=?1.00, 0.98–1.01). Temporal changes in BP were not associated with risk of breast cancer (per 5?mmHg change in SBP, hazard ratio?=?1.00, 0.97–1.03). Increased DBP over time was associated with higher risk of triple-negative breast cancer (P?=?0.04), based on a small number of cases (N?=?41). CONCLUSION:: Our study supports previous findings of no association between BP and breast cancer. Similar conclusions were reached when assessing BP over time and when examining specific tumor subtypes.",
author = "Yi Yang and Lynch, {Brigid M.} and Hodge, {Allison M.} and Danny Liew and Mclean, {Catriona A.} and Mathias Seviiri and Southey, {Melissa Caroline} and Hopper, {John L.} and English, {Dallas R.} and Giles, {Graham G.} and Milne, {Roger L} and Dugu{\'e}, {Pierre Antoine}",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1097/HJH.0000000000001372",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "1371--1380",
journal = "Journal of Hypertension",
issn = "0263-6352",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "7",

}

Blood pressure and risk of breast cancer, overall and by subtypes : a prospective cohort study. / Yang, Yi; Lynch, Brigid M.; Hodge, Allison M.; Liew, Danny; Mclean, Catriona A.; Seviiri, Mathias; Southey, Melissa Caroline; Hopper, John L.; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L; Dugué, Pierre Antoine.

In: Journal of Hypertension, Vol. 35, No. 7, 07.2017, p. 1371-1380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Blood pressure and risk of breast cancer, overall and by subtypes

T2 - a prospective cohort study

AU - Yang, Yi

AU - Lynch, Brigid M.

AU - Hodge, Allison M.

AU - Liew, Danny

AU - Mclean, Catriona A.

AU - Seviiri, Mathias

AU - Southey, Melissa Caroline

AU - Hopper, John L.

AU - English, Dallas R.

AU - Giles, Graham G.

AU - Milne, Roger L

AU - Dugué, Pierre Antoine

PY - 2017/7

Y1 - 2017/7

N2 - OBJECTIVE:: Blood pressure (BP) and breast cancer may share a common pathophysiologic pathway involving chronic inflammation, hormone synthesis and metabolism. Previous studies investigating the association between BP and breast cancer measured BP at a single time point and did not examine associations by breast cancer molecular subtypes. METHODS:: We used data from 22?833 female participants in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. BP was objectively measured at baseline (1990–1994) and a follow-up visit (2003–2007). Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for baseline BP and temporal changes in BP in relation to risk of breast cancer, overall and by molecular subtypes. RESULTS:: We did not observe any associations between BP measured at baseline and breast cancer risk overall (per 5?mmHg SBP, hazard ratio?=?1.00, 95% confidence interval: 0.99–1.02), nor by subtype (per 5?mmHg SBP: estrogen-receptor-negative: hazard ratio?=?0.99, 0.96–1.03, progesterone-receptor-negative: hazard ratio?=?1.01, 0.99–1.04, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative: hazard ratio?=?1.00, 0.98–1.01). Temporal changes in BP were not associated with risk of breast cancer (per 5?mmHg change in SBP, hazard ratio?=?1.00, 0.97–1.03). Increased DBP over time was associated with higher risk of triple-negative breast cancer (P?=?0.04), based on a small number of cases (N?=?41). CONCLUSION:: Our study supports previous findings of no association between BP and breast cancer. Similar conclusions were reached when assessing BP over time and when examining specific tumor subtypes.

AB - OBJECTIVE:: Blood pressure (BP) and breast cancer may share a common pathophysiologic pathway involving chronic inflammation, hormone synthesis and metabolism. Previous studies investigating the association between BP and breast cancer measured BP at a single time point and did not examine associations by breast cancer molecular subtypes. METHODS:: We used data from 22?833 female participants in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. BP was objectively measured at baseline (1990–1994) and a follow-up visit (2003–2007). Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios for baseline BP and temporal changes in BP in relation to risk of breast cancer, overall and by molecular subtypes. RESULTS:: We did not observe any associations between BP measured at baseline and breast cancer risk overall (per 5?mmHg SBP, hazard ratio?=?1.00, 95% confidence interval: 0.99–1.02), nor by subtype (per 5?mmHg SBP: estrogen-receptor-negative: hazard ratio?=?0.99, 0.96–1.03, progesterone-receptor-negative: hazard ratio?=?1.01, 0.99–1.04, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative: hazard ratio?=?1.00, 0.98–1.01). Temporal changes in BP were not associated with risk of breast cancer (per 5?mmHg change in SBP, hazard ratio?=?1.00, 0.97–1.03). Increased DBP over time was associated with higher risk of triple-negative breast cancer (P?=?0.04), based on a small number of cases (N?=?41). CONCLUSION:: Our study supports previous findings of no association between BP and breast cancer. Similar conclusions were reached when assessing BP over time and when examining specific tumor subtypes.

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JO - Journal of Hypertension

JF - Journal of Hypertension

SN - 0263-6352

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