Biomimetic materials in tissue engineering

Jennifer Patterson, Mikaël M. Martino, Jeffrey A. Hubbell

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

174 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biomaterial matrices are being developed that mimic the key characteristics of the extracellular matrix, including presenting adhesion sites and displaying growth factors in the context of a viscoelastic hydrogel. This review focuses on two classes of materials: those that are derived from naturally occurring molecules and those that recapitulate key motifs of biomolecules within biologically active synthetic materials. For biologically derived materials, methods are being sought to gain molecular-level control over biological characteristics and biomechanics. For synthetic, biomimetic materials, chemical schemes are being developed to enable in situ cross-linking and protease-dependent degradation and release of incorporated growth factors. These materials will open new doors to biosurgical therapeutics in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-22
Number of pages9
JournalMaterials Today
Volume13
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Patterson, Jennifer ; Martino, Mikaël M. ; Hubbell, Jeffrey A. / Biomimetic materials in tissue engineering. In: Materials Today. 2010 ; Vol. 13, No. 1-2. pp. 14-22.
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Biomimetic materials in tissue engineering. / Patterson, Jennifer; Martino, Mikaël M.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

In: Materials Today, Vol. 13, No. 1-2, 01.2010, p. 14-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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