Biodosimetric transcriptional and proteomic changes are conserved in irradiated human tissue

Simon P. Keam, Twishi Gulati, Cristina Gamell, Franco Caramia, Gisela Mir Arnau, Cheng Huang, Ralf B. Schittenhelm, Oded Kleifeld, Paul J. Neeson, Scott G. Williams, Ygal Haupt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Transcriptional dosimetry is an emergent field of radiobiology aimed at developing robust methods for detecting and quantifying absorbed doses using radiation-induced fluctuations in gene expression. A combination of RNA sequencing, array-based and quantitative PCR transcriptomics in cellular, murine and various ex vivo human models has led to a comprehensive description of a fundamental set of genes with demonstrable dosimetric qualities. However, these are yet to be validated in human tissue due to the scarcity of in situ-irradiated source material. This represents a major hurdle to the continued development of transcriptional dosimetry. In this study, we present a novel evaluation of a previously reported set of dosimetric genes in human tissue exposed to a large therapeutic dose of radiation. To do this, we evaluated the quantitative changes of a set of dosimetric transcripts consisting of FDXR, BAX, BCL2, CDKN1A, DDB2, BBC3, GADD45A, GDF15, MDM2, SERPINE1, TNFRSF10B, PLK3, SESN2 and VWCE in guided pre- and post-radiation (2 weeks) prostate cancer biopsies from seven patients. We confirmed the prolonged dose-responsivity of most of these transcripts in in situ-irradiated tissue. BCL2, GDF15, and to some extent TNFRSF10B, were markedly unreliable single markers of radiation exposure. Nevertheless, as a full set, these genes reliably segregated non-irradiated and irradiated tissues and predicted radiation absorption on a patient-specific basis. We also confirmed changes in the translated protein product for a small subset of these dosimeters. This study provides the first confirmatory evidence of an existing dosimetric gene set in less-accessible tissues—ensuring peripheral responses reflect tissue-specific effects. Further work will be required to determine if these changes are conserved in different tissue types, post-radiation times and doses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-249
Number of pages9
JournalRadiation and Environmental Biophysics
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2018

Keywords

  • Biodosimeter
  • Prostate
  • Radiation
  • Transcriptional

Cite this

Keam, Simon P. ; Gulati, Twishi ; Gamell, Cristina ; Caramia, Franco ; Arnau, Gisela Mir ; Huang, Cheng ; Schittenhelm, Ralf B. ; Kleifeld, Oded ; Neeson, Paul J. ; Williams, Scott G. ; Haupt, Ygal. / Biodosimetric transcriptional and proteomic changes are conserved in irradiated human tissue. In: Radiation and Environmental Biophysics. 2018 ; Vol. 57, No. 3. pp. 241-249.
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Biodosimetric transcriptional and proteomic changes are conserved in irradiated human tissue. / Keam, Simon P.; Gulati, Twishi; Gamell, Cristina; Caramia, Franco; Arnau, Gisela Mir; Huang, Cheng; Schittenhelm, Ralf B.; Kleifeld, Oded; Neeson, Paul J.; Williams, Scott G.; Haupt, Ygal.

In: Radiation and Environmental Biophysics, Vol. 57, No. 3, 08.2018, p. 241-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Gulati, Twishi

AU - Gamell, Cristina

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AU - Huang, Cheng

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