Biodegradable foams for biomedical applications

Wendy Busby, Neil Cameron

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Motivations for exploring the creation of man-made tissues (cell transplantation) and the growth of artificial organs (neoorgans) are varied. Early matrices, following on from the injection of cells into other tissues, were constructed from extracellular matrix proteins e.g. collagen. Limitations in structure and strength led to current materials that are either a composite matrix, i.e. a fibre mesh supported by a second polymer; or a monolithic sponge-like structure - foam. PolyHIPE (High Internal Phase Emulsion) polymers are emulsion-derived foams. The product has an open-cellular macroporous morphology. Porosity varies between 74 and 99% and cell size from 10 to 200_m. Conditions can be set to control the former attributes, as well as surface area and cellular interconnectedness. A Scanning Electron Microscope image of a typical poly(styrene/divinylbenzene) PolyHIPE is shown in Fig. 1. Biodegradability is being achieved by using materials containing a weak ester linkage e.g. polycaprolactone and polylactic acid. We are using PolyHIPE's to create a 3D biodegradable matrix on which cells can be grown with the idea of potentially using them for both cell transplantation and neoorgan growth.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2000
Externally publishedYes
EventSecond Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Tissue Engineering 2000: Advances in Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Cell Signalling - York, United Kingdom
Duration: 16 Jul 200019 Jul 2000

Conference

ConferenceSecond Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Tissue Engineering 2000: Advances in Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Cell Signalling
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityYork
Period16/07/0019/07/00

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