Beyond business as usual

How (and why) the habit discontinuity hypothesis can inform SME engagement in environmental sustainability practices

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A lack of small and medium enterprise (SME) engagement in environmental practices has caused stakeholders to advocate several different approaches to encourage organisational change.While program investment and research has been dedicated to developing and implementing external drivers, at least two internal factors have not been given sufficient research attention when it comes to the uptake of environmental initiatives among SMEs. These are: the strength of embedded habits and routines,and whether or not a business is indeed ready to embrace change. We take these factors into account and show how a habit discontinuity approach with an emphasis on timing may foster greater engagement and uptake of environmental initiatives among SMEs. Alternatives and limitations are considered and a conceptual framework is introduced to guide research and future interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)426-442
Number of pages17
JournalAustralasian Journal of Environmental Management
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • small business
  • environmental management
  • owner-managers
  • routines
  • habits
  • change
  • readiness

Cite this

@article{a2cd43742fcf4d4da94d8d5e4064d249,
title = "Beyond business as usual: How (and why) the habit discontinuity hypothesis can inform SME engagement in environmental sustainability practices",
abstract = "A lack of small and medium enterprise (SME) engagement in environmental practices has caused stakeholders to advocate several different approaches to encourage organisational change.While program investment and research has been dedicated to developing and implementing external drivers, at least two internal factors have not been given sufficient research attention when it comes to the uptake of environmental initiatives among SMEs. These are: the strength of embedded habits and routines,and whether or not a business is indeed ready to embrace change. We take these factors into account and show how a habit discontinuity approach with an emphasis on timing may foster greater engagement and uptake of environmental initiatives among SMEs. Alternatives and limitations are considered and a conceptual framework is introduced to guide research and future interventions.",
keywords = "small business, environmental management, owner-managers, routines, habits, change, readiness",
author = "Janice Redmond and {Wolfram Cox}, {Julie Rosalind} and Curtis, {James Michael} and Andrea Kirk-Brown and Beth Walker",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1080/14486563.2016.1188424",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "426--442",
journal = "Australasian Journal of Environmental Management",
issn = "1448-6563",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Beyond business as usual

T2 - How (and why) the habit discontinuity hypothesis can inform SME engagement in environmental sustainability practices

AU - Redmond, Janice

AU - Wolfram Cox, Julie Rosalind

AU - Curtis, James Michael

AU - Kirk-Brown, Andrea

AU - Walker, Beth

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - A lack of small and medium enterprise (SME) engagement in environmental practices has caused stakeholders to advocate several different approaches to encourage organisational change.While program investment and research has been dedicated to developing and implementing external drivers, at least two internal factors have not been given sufficient research attention when it comes to the uptake of environmental initiatives among SMEs. These are: the strength of embedded habits and routines,and whether or not a business is indeed ready to embrace change. We take these factors into account and show how a habit discontinuity approach with an emphasis on timing may foster greater engagement and uptake of environmental initiatives among SMEs. Alternatives and limitations are considered and a conceptual framework is introduced to guide research and future interventions.

AB - A lack of small and medium enterprise (SME) engagement in environmental practices has caused stakeholders to advocate several different approaches to encourage organisational change.While program investment and research has been dedicated to developing and implementing external drivers, at least two internal factors have not been given sufficient research attention when it comes to the uptake of environmental initiatives among SMEs. These are: the strength of embedded habits and routines,and whether or not a business is indeed ready to embrace change. We take these factors into account and show how a habit discontinuity approach with an emphasis on timing may foster greater engagement and uptake of environmental initiatives among SMEs. Alternatives and limitations are considered and a conceptual framework is introduced to guide research and future interventions.

KW - small business

KW - environmental management

KW - owner-managers

KW - routines

KW - habits

KW - change

KW - readiness

U2 - 10.1080/14486563.2016.1188424

DO - 10.1080/14486563.2016.1188424

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 426

EP - 442

JO - Australasian Journal of Environmental Management

JF - Australasian Journal of Environmental Management

SN - 1448-6563

IS - 4

ER -