Being born too small and too early may alter sleep in childhood

Stephanie R. Yiallourou, Bianca C. Arena, Euan M. Wallace, Alexsandria Odoi, Samantha Hollis, Aidan Weichard, Rosemary S.C. Horne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Study Objectives: Fetal growth restriction (FGR) occurs in up to 10% of pregnancies and is associated with increased risk of prematurity and neurodevelopmental impairment. FGR also alters sleep-state distribution in utero and maturation in infancy. Currently, limited data on the long-term associations of FGR and childhood sleep exist. Accordingly, we assessed the associations between preterm birth and FGR and sleep in children aged 5-12 years. Methods: Seventeen children born preterm and FGR, 15 children born preterm but appropriately grown (appropriate birth weight for gestational age [AGA]), and 20 term AGA children (controls) were studied using overnight polysomnography. Sleep macroarchitecture was assessed using standard criteria, and sleep microarchitecture was assessed using spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram (C4-M1) with total, δ (0.5-3.9 Hz), θ (4.0-7.9Hz), α (8.0-11.9 Hz), σ (12.0-13.9 Hz), and β power (14.0-30 Hz) calculated. Results: For sleep macroarchitecture, preterm FGR children had higher N2% compared with term AGA children (p < .05). Preterm AGA children had reduced total sleep time, NREM%, and sleep efficiency compared with term AGA children (p < .05 for all). For sleep microarchitecture, preterm FGR children had a higher amount of total, δ and α power compared with both groups (p < .05). Sigma and β power was lowest in the preterm AGA group compared with both groups (p < .05 for both). Conclusions: Prematurity and FGR were associated with altered sleep macro- and microarchitecture measures indicative of reduced sleep quantity and quality in childhood. As sleep disturbance can affect both behavior and neurodevelopment in children, sleep in FGR and preterm children warrants further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberzsx193
Number of pages11
JournalSleep
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • EEG spectral analysis
  • Fetal growth restriction
  • Pediatric
  • Preterm birth
  • Sleep

Cite this

Yiallourou, Stephanie R. ; Arena, Bianca C. ; Wallace, Euan M. ; Odoi, Alexsandria ; Hollis, Samantha ; Weichard, Aidan ; Horne, Rosemary S.C. / Being born too small and too early may alter sleep in childhood. In: Sleep. 2018 ; Vol. 41, No. 2.
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title = "Being born too small and too early may alter sleep in childhood",
abstract = "Study Objectives: Fetal growth restriction (FGR) occurs in up to 10{\%} of pregnancies and is associated with increased risk of prematurity and neurodevelopmental impairment. FGR also alters sleep-state distribution in utero and maturation in infancy. Currently, limited data on the long-term associations of FGR and childhood sleep exist. Accordingly, we assessed the associations between preterm birth and FGR and sleep in children aged 5-12 years. Methods: Seventeen children born preterm and FGR, 15 children born preterm but appropriately grown (appropriate birth weight for gestational age [AGA]), and 20 term AGA children (controls) were studied using overnight polysomnography. Sleep macroarchitecture was assessed using standard criteria, and sleep microarchitecture was assessed using spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram (C4-M1) with total, δ (0.5-3.9 Hz), θ (4.0-7.9Hz), α (8.0-11.9 Hz), σ (12.0-13.9 Hz), and β power (14.0-30 Hz) calculated. Results: For sleep macroarchitecture, preterm FGR children had higher N2{\%} compared with term AGA children (p < .05). Preterm AGA children had reduced total sleep time, NREM{\%}, and sleep efficiency compared with term AGA children (p < .05 for all). For sleep microarchitecture, preterm FGR children had a higher amount of total, δ and α power compared with both groups (p < .05). Sigma and β power was lowest in the preterm AGA group compared with both groups (p < .05 for both). Conclusions: Prematurity and FGR were associated with altered sleep macro- and microarchitecture measures indicative of reduced sleep quantity and quality in childhood. As sleep disturbance can affect both behavior and neurodevelopment in children, sleep in FGR and preterm children warrants further investigation.",
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author = "Yiallourou, {Stephanie R.} and Arena, {Bianca C.} and Wallace, {Euan M.} and Alexsandria Odoi and Samantha Hollis and Aidan Weichard and Horne, {Rosemary S.C.}",
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Being born too small and too early may alter sleep in childhood. / Yiallourou, Stephanie R.; Arena, Bianca C.; Wallace, Euan M.; Odoi, Alexsandria; Hollis, Samantha; Weichard, Aidan; Horne, Rosemary S.C.

In: Sleep, Vol. 41, No. 2, zsx193, 01.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Being born too small and too early may alter sleep in childhood

AU - Yiallourou, Stephanie R.

AU - Arena, Bianca C.

AU - Wallace, Euan M.

AU - Odoi, Alexsandria

AU - Hollis, Samantha

AU - Weichard, Aidan

AU - Horne, Rosemary S.C.

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Study Objectives: Fetal growth restriction (FGR) occurs in up to 10% of pregnancies and is associated with increased risk of prematurity and neurodevelopmental impairment. FGR also alters sleep-state distribution in utero and maturation in infancy. Currently, limited data on the long-term associations of FGR and childhood sleep exist. Accordingly, we assessed the associations between preterm birth and FGR and sleep in children aged 5-12 years. Methods: Seventeen children born preterm and FGR, 15 children born preterm but appropriately grown (appropriate birth weight for gestational age [AGA]), and 20 term AGA children (controls) were studied using overnight polysomnography. Sleep macroarchitecture was assessed using standard criteria, and sleep microarchitecture was assessed using spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram (C4-M1) with total, δ (0.5-3.9 Hz), θ (4.0-7.9Hz), α (8.0-11.9 Hz), σ (12.0-13.9 Hz), and β power (14.0-30 Hz) calculated. Results: For sleep macroarchitecture, preterm FGR children had higher N2% compared with term AGA children (p < .05). Preterm AGA children had reduced total sleep time, NREM%, and sleep efficiency compared with term AGA children (p < .05 for all). For sleep microarchitecture, preterm FGR children had a higher amount of total, δ and α power compared with both groups (p < .05). Sigma and β power was lowest in the preterm AGA group compared with both groups (p < .05 for both). Conclusions: Prematurity and FGR were associated with altered sleep macro- and microarchitecture measures indicative of reduced sleep quantity and quality in childhood. As sleep disturbance can affect both behavior and neurodevelopment in children, sleep in FGR and preterm children warrants further investigation.

AB - Study Objectives: Fetal growth restriction (FGR) occurs in up to 10% of pregnancies and is associated with increased risk of prematurity and neurodevelopmental impairment. FGR also alters sleep-state distribution in utero and maturation in infancy. Currently, limited data on the long-term associations of FGR and childhood sleep exist. Accordingly, we assessed the associations between preterm birth and FGR and sleep in children aged 5-12 years. Methods: Seventeen children born preterm and FGR, 15 children born preterm but appropriately grown (appropriate birth weight for gestational age [AGA]), and 20 term AGA children (controls) were studied using overnight polysomnography. Sleep macroarchitecture was assessed using standard criteria, and sleep microarchitecture was assessed using spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram (C4-M1) with total, δ (0.5-3.9 Hz), θ (4.0-7.9Hz), α (8.0-11.9 Hz), σ (12.0-13.9 Hz), and β power (14.0-30 Hz) calculated. Results: For sleep macroarchitecture, preterm FGR children had higher N2% compared with term AGA children (p < .05). Preterm AGA children had reduced total sleep time, NREM%, and sleep efficiency compared with term AGA children (p < .05 for all). For sleep microarchitecture, preterm FGR children had a higher amount of total, δ and α power compared with both groups (p < .05). Sigma and β power was lowest in the preterm AGA group compared with both groups (p < .05 for both). Conclusions: Prematurity and FGR were associated with altered sleep macro- and microarchitecture measures indicative of reduced sleep quantity and quality in childhood. As sleep disturbance can affect both behavior and neurodevelopment in children, sleep in FGR and preterm children warrants further investigation.

KW - EEG spectral analysis

KW - Fetal growth restriction

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KW - Preterm birth

KW - Sleep

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