Behaviours of concern following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in individuals living in the community

A. J. Hicks, K. R. Gould, Max Hopwood, Justin Kenardy, Iveta Krivonos, J. L. Ponsford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary Objective: Behaviours of Concern (BoC) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a significant negative impact on the daily functioning and quality of life for the individual and their family. However, there has been limited research examining the nature and severity of BoC beyond the acute recovery period, including the perspective of the individual with TBI as well as close others (COs). Methods and Procedure: Eighty-nine individuals with predominantly severe TBI, at a mean of 11.4 years’ post-injury, were identified through a no-fault accident compensation system database. Structured interviews were completed with 65 individuals with TBI, and 62 COs. Current BoC were documented using the Overt Behaviour Scale (OBS). Main Outcomes and Results: 70.5% of participants exhibited BoC on the OBS, with an average of 3 behaviours. Verbal aggression and socially inappropriate behaviour were the most common BoC. Self-report of behaviour change was endorsed by 81% of the sample. There was generally poor concordance between the perspectives of the individual with the TBI and their CO. Conclusion: Severe BoC, across multiple behaviour types, may be evident many years following predominantly severe TBI. There is a need to provide long-term behaviour support for these individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1312-1319
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Injury
Volume31
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jul 2017

Keywords

  • behaviour
  • behaviours of concern
  • Traumatic brain injury

Cite this

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abstract = "Primary Objective: Behaviours of Concern (BoC) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) have a significant negative impact on the daily functioning and quality of life for the individual and their family. However, there has been limited research examining the nature and severity of BoC beyond the acute recovery period, including the perspective of the individual with TBI as well as close others (COs). Methods and Procedure: Eighty-nine individuals with predominantly severe TBI, at a mean of 11.4 years’ post-injury, were identified through a no-fault accident compensation system database. Structured interviews were completed with 65 individuals with TBI, and 62 COs. Current BoC were documented using the Overt Behaviour Scale (OBS). Main Outcomes and Results: 70.5{\%} of participants exhibited BoC on the OBS, with an average of 3 behaviours. Verbal aggression and socially inappropriate behaviour were the most common BoC. Self-report of behaviour change was endorsed by 81{\%} of the sample. There was generally poor concordance between the perspectives of the individual with the TBI and their CO. Conclusion: Severe BoC, across multiple behaviour types, may be evident many years following predominantly severe TBI. There is a need to provide long-term behaviour support for these individuals.",
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Behaviours of concern following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in individuals living in the community. / Hicks, A. J.; Gould, K. R.; Hopwood, Max; Kenardy, Justin; Krivonos, Iveta; Ponsford, J. L.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 31, No. 10, 07.07.2017, p. 1312-1319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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