Batch process particle separation using surface acoustic waves (SAW): Integration of travelling and standing SAW

Citsabehsan Devendran, Nipuna R. Gunasekara, David J. Collins, Adrian Neild

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Acoustic fields offer a versatile and non-contact method for particle and cell manipulation, where several acoustofluidic systems have been developed for the purpose of sorting. However, in almost all cases, these systems utilize a steady flow to either define the exposure time to the acoustic field or to counteract the acoustic forces. Batch-based systems, within which sorting occurs in a confined volume, are compatible with smaller sample volumes without the need for externally pumped flow, though remain relatively underdeveloped. Here, the effects of utilizing a combination of travelling and standing waves on particles of different sizes are examined. We use a pressure field combining both travelling and standing wave components along with a swept excitation frequency, to collect and isolate particles of different sizes in a static fluid volume. This mechanism is employed to demonstrate size-based deterministic sorting of particles. Specifically, 5.1 μm and 7 μm particles are separated using a frequency range from 60 MHz to 90 MHz, and 5.1 μm particles are separated from 3.1 μm using an excitation sweeping between 70 MHz and 120 MHz.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5856-5864
Number of pages9
JournalRSC Advances
Volume6
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Cite this

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title = "Batch process particle separation using surface acoustic waves (SAW): Integration of travelling and standing SAW",
abstract = "Acoustic fields offer a versatile and non-contact method for particle and cell manipulation, where several acoustofluidic systems have been developed for the purpose of sorting. However, in almost all cases, these systems utilize a steady flow to either define the exposure time to the acoustic field or to counteract the acoustic forces. Batch-based systems, within which sorting occurs in a confined volume, are compatible with smaller sample volumes without the need for externally pumped flow, though remain relatively underdeveloped. Here, the effects of utilizing a combination of travelling and standing waves on particles of different sizes are examined. We use a pressure field combining both travelling and standing wave components along with a swept excitation frequency, to collect and isolate particles of different sizes in a static fluid volume. This mechanism is employed to demonstrate size-based deterministic sorting of particles. Specifically, 5.1 μm and 7 μm particles are separated using a frequency range from 60 MHz to 90 MHz, and 5.1 μm particles are separated from 3.1 μm using an excitation sweeping between 70 MHz and 120 MHz.",
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Batch process particle separation using surface acoustic waves (SAW) : Integration of travelling and standing SAW. / Devendran, Citsabehsan; Gunasekara, Nipuna R.; Collins, David J.; Neild, Adrian.

In: RSC Advances, Vol. 6, No. 7, 2016, p. 5856-5864.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Batch process particle separation using surface acoustic waves (SAW)

T2 - Integration of travelling and standing SAW

AU - Devendran, Citsabehsan

AU - Gunasekara, Nipuna R.

AU - Collins, David J.

AU - Neild, Adrian

PY - 2016

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AB - Acoustic fields offer a versatile and non-contact method for particle and cell manipulation, where several acoustofluidic systems have been developed for the purpose of sorting. However, in almost all cases, these systems utilize a steady flow to either define the exposure time to the acoustic field or to counteract the acoustic forces. Batch-based systems, within which sorting occurs in a confined volume, are compatible with smaller sample volumes without the need for externally pumped flow, though remain relatively underdeveloped. Here, the effects of utilizing a combination of travelling and standing waves on particles of different sizes are examined. We use a pressure field combining both travelling and standing wave components along with a swept excitation frequency, to collect and isolate particles of different sizes in a static fluid volume. This mechanism is employed to demonstrate size-based deterministic sorting of particles. Specifically, 5.1 μm and 7 μm particles are separated using a frequency range from 60 MHz to 90 MHz, and 5.1 μm particles are separated from 3.1 μm using an excitation sweeping between 70 MHz and 120 MHz.

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