Autonomy at work in the gig economy

analysing work status, work content and working conditions of independent professionals

François Pichault, Tui McKeown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper offers a critical perspective on the debate surrounding autonomy at work for a specific category of non-standard workers: independent professionals. The increasing numbers now working this way as well as their spread into all sectors, industries and occupations, mean that their work arrangements can no longer be dismissed as non-standard or atypical. Defining them by what they are not is quite simply no longer an option. Our paper examines the various components intertwined behind the taken-for-granted concept of autonomy. Drawing on debates from the legal through to the sociological and HR literatures, we identify three underlying dimensions to autonomy. When combined, they provide the basis for an analytical matrix that may assist policy makers, practitioners and individual workers to understand the challenges and opportunities linked to new ways of working.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-72
Number of pages14
JournalNew Technology, Work and Employment
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • autonomy
  • independent professionals
  • work status
  • work content
  • working conditions
  • future of work

Cite this

@article{33b72e1fc0a041b79e042db435bc8147,
title = "Autonomy at work in the gig economy: analysing work status, work content and working conditions of independent professionals",
abstract = "This paper offers a critical perspective on the debate surrounding autonomy at work for a specific category of non-standard workers: independent professionals. The increasing numbers now working this way as well as their spread into all sectors, industries and occupations, mean that their work arrangements can no longer be dismissed as non-standard or atypical. Defining them by what they are not is quite simply no longer an option. Our paper examines the various components intertwined behind the taken-for-granted concept of autonomy. Drawing on debates from the legal through to the sociological and HR literatures, we identify three underlying dimensions to autonomy. When combined, they provide the basis for an analytical matrix that may assist policy makers, practitioners and individual workers to understand the challenges and opportunities linked to new ways of working.",
keywords = "autonomy, independent professionals, work status, work content, working conditions, future of work",
author = "Fran{\cc}ois Pichault and Tui McKeown",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ntwe.12132",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "59--72",
journal = "New Technology, Work and Employment",
issn = "1468-005X",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",
number = "1",

}

Autonomy at work in the gig economy : analysing work status, work content and working conditions of independent professionals. / Pichault, François; McKeown, Tui.

In: New Technology, Work and Employment, Vol. 34, No. 1, 01.03.2019, p. 59-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Autonomy at work in the gig economy

T2 - analysing work status, work content and working conditions of independent professionals

AU - Pichault, François

AU - McKeown, Tui

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - This paper offers a critical perspective on the debate surrounding autonomy at work for a specific category of non-standard workers: independent professionals. The increasing numbers now working this way as well as their spread into all sectors, industries and occupations, mean that their work arrangements can no longer be dismissed as non-standard or atypical. Defining them by what they are not is quite simply no longer an option. Our paper examines the various components intertwined behind the taken-for-granted concept of autonomy. Drawing on debates from the legal through to the sociological and HR literatures, we identify three underlying dimensions to autonomy. When combined, they provide the basis for an analytical matrix that may assist policy makers, practitioners and individual workers to understand the challenges and opportunities linked to new ways of working.

AB - This paper offers a critical perspective on the debate surrounding autonomy at work for a specific category of non-standard workers: independent professionals. The increasing numbers now working this way as well as their spread into all sectors, industries and occupations, mean that their work arrangements can no longer be dismissed as non-standard or atypical. Defining them by what they are not is quite simply no longer an option. Our paper examines the various components intertwined behind the taken-for-granted concept of autonomy. Drawing on debates from the legal through to the sociological and HR literatures, we identify three underlying dimensions to autonomy. When combined, they provide the basis for an analytical matrix that may assist policy makers, practitioners and individual workers to understand the challenges and opportunities linked to new ways of working.

KW - autonomy

KW - independent professionals

KW - work status

KW - work content

KW - working conditions

KW - future of work

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062601306&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ntwe.12132

DO - 10.1111/ntwe.12132

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 59

EP - 72

JO - New Technology, Work and Employment

JF - New Technology, Work and Employment

SN - 1468-005X

IS - 1

ER -