Autobiographical Memory from Different Life Stages in Individuals with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Neha Delhikar, Lucy Sommers, Genevieve Rayner, Rachel Schembri, Stephen R. Robinson, Sarah Wilson, Melinda L. Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Autobiographical memory dysfunction is a marker of vulnerability to depression. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) experience high rates of depression and memory impairment, and autobiographical memory impairments have been observed compared to healthy controls; however, these groups were not age-matched. This study aimed to determine whether individuals with untreated OSA have impaired autobiographical memory when compared to age-matched controls, and to assess the quality of autobiographical memories from three broad time points. Methods: A total of 44 participants with OSA (M age=49.4±13.0) and 44 age-matched controls (M age=50.0±13.1) completed the Autobiographical Memory Interview (AMI) to assess semantic and episodic memories from three different life stages, and 44 OSA participants and 37 controls completed the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) to assess overgeneral memory recall (an inability to retrieve specific memories). Results: OSA participants had significantly poorer semantic recall of early adult life on the AMI (p<.001), and more overgeneral autobiographical memories recalled on the AMT (=.001), than controls. Poor semantic recall from early adult life was significantly correlated with more depressive symptoms (p=0.006) and lower education (p<0.02), while higher overgeneral memory recall was significantly associated with older age (p=.001). Conclusions: A specific deficit in semantic autobiographical recall was observed in individuals with OSA. OSA patients recalled more overgeneral memories, suggesting that aspects of the sleep disorder affect their ability to recollect specific details of events from their life. These cognitive features of OSA may contribute to the high incidence of depression in this population. (JINS, 2019, 00, 1-9)

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)266-274
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Episodic memory
  • Lifespan
  • Polysomnography
  • Semantic memory
  • Sleep

Cite this

Delhikar, Neha ; Sommers, Lucy ; Rayner, Genevieve ; Schembri, Rachel ; Robinson, Stephen R. ; Wilson, Sarah ; Jackson, Melinda L. / Autobiographical Memory from Different Life Stages in Individuals with Obstructive Sleep Apnea. In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. 2019 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 266-274.
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title = "Autobiographical Memory from Different Life Stages in Individuals with Obstructive Sleep Apnea",
abstract = "Objectives: Autobiographical memory dysfunction is a marker of vulnerability to depression. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) experience high rates of depression and memory impairment, and autobiographical memory impairments have been observed compared to healthy controls; however, these groups were not age-matched. This study aimed to determine whether individuals with untreated OSA have impaired autobiographical memory when compared to age-matched controls, and to assess the quality of autobiographical memories from three broad time points. Methods: A total of 44 participants with OSA (M age=49.4±13.0) and 44 age-matched controls (M age=50.0±13.1) completed the Autobiographical Memory Interview (AMI) to assess semantic and episodic memories from three different life stages, and 44 OSA participants and 37 controls completed the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) to assess overgeneral memory recall (an inability to retrieve specific memories). Results: OSA participants had significantly poorer semantic recall of early adult life on the AMI (p<.001), and more overgeneral autobiographical memories recalled on the AMT (=.001), than controls. Poor semantic recall from early adult life was significantly correlated with more depressive symptoms (p=0.006) and lower education (p<0.02), while higher overgeneral memory recall was significantly associated with older age (p=.001). Conclusions: A specific deficit in semantic autobiographical recall was observed in individuals with OSA. OSA patients recalled more overgeneral memories, suggesting that aspects of the sleep disorder affect their ability to recollect specific details of events from their life. These cognitive features of OSA may contribute to the high incidence of depression in this population. (JINS, 2019, 00, 1-9)",
keywords = "Depression, Episodic memory, Lifespan, Polysomnography, Semantic memory, Sleep",
author = "Neha Delhikar and Lucy Sommers and Genevieve Rayner and Rachel Schembri and Robinson, {Stephen R.} and Sarah Wilson and Jackson, {Melinda L.}",
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Autobiographical Memory from Different Life Stages in Individuals with Obstructive Sleep Apnea. / Delhikar, Neha; Sommers, Lucy; Rayner, Genevieve; Schembri, Rachel; Robinson, Stephen R.; Wilson, Sarah; Jackson, Melinda L.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 25, No. 3, 03.2019, p. 266-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Autobiographical Memory from Different Life Stages in Individuals with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

AU - Delhikar, Neha

AU - Sommers, Lucy

AU - Rayner, Genevieve

AU - Schembri, Rachel

AU - Robinson, Stephen R.

AU - Wilson, Sarah

AU - Jackson, Melinda L.

PY - 2019/3

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N2 - Objectives: Autobiographical memory dysfunction is a marker of vulnerability to depression. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) experience high rates of depression and memory impairment, and autobiographical memory impairments have been observed compared to healthy controls; however, these groups were not age-matched. This study aimed to determine whether individuals with untreated OSA have impaired autobiographical memory when compared to age-matched controls, and to assess the quality of autobiographical memories from three broad time points. Methods: A total of 44 participants with OSA (M age=49.4±13.0) and 44 age-matched controls (M age=50.0±13.1) completed the Autobiographical Memory Interview (AMI) to assess semantic and episodic memories from three different life stages, and 44 OSA participants and 37 controls completed the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) to assess overgeneral memory recall (an inability to retrieve specific memories). Results: OSA participants had significantly poorer semantic recall of early adult life on the AMI (p<.001), and more overgeneral autobiographical memories recalled on the AMT (=.001), than controls. Poor semantic recall from early adult life was significantly correlated with more depressive symptoms (p=0.006) and lower education (p<0.02), while higher overgeneral memory recall was significantly associated with older age (p=.001). Conclusions: A specific deficit in semantic autobiographical recall was observed in individuals with OSA. OSA patients recalled more overgeneral memories, suggesting that aspects of the sleep disorder affect their ability to recollect specific details of events from their life. These cognitive features of OSA may contribute to the high incidence of depression in this population. (JINS, 2019, 00, 1-9)

AB - Objectives: Autobiographical memory dysfunction is a marker of vulnerability to depression. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) experience high rates of depression and memory impairment, and autobiographical memory impairments have been observed compared to healthy controls; however, these groups were not age-matched. This study aimed to determine whether individuals with untreated OSA have impaired autobiographical memory when compared to age-matched controls, and to assess the quality of autobiographical memories from three broad time points. Methods: A total of 44 participants with OSA (M age=49.4±13.0) and 44 age-matched controls (M age=50.0±13.1) completed the Autobiographical Memory Interview (AMI) to assess semantic and episodic memories from three different life stages, and 44 OSA participants and 37 controls completed the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT) to assess overgeneral memory recall (an inability to retrieve specific memories). Results: OSA participants had significantly poorer semantic recall of early adult life on the AMI (p<.001), and more overgeneral autobiographical memories recalled on the AMT (=.001), than controls. Poor semantic recall from early adult life was significantly correlated with more depressive symptoms (p=0.006) and lower education (p<0.02), while higher overgeneral memory recall was significantly associated with older age (p=.001). Conclusions: A specific deficit in semantic autobiographical recall was observed in individuals with OSA. OSA patients recalled more overgeneral memories, suggesting that aspects of the sleep disorder affect their ability to recollect specific details of events from their life. These cognitive features of OSA may contribute to the high incidence of depression in this population. (JINS, 2019, 00, 1-9)

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