Australian same-sex attracted women resisting sexism and homophobia

a qualitative investigation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The paper reports on research which explores how Australian same-sex attracted (SSA) women use resistance strategies to cope and build resilience in the face of sexism and homophobia. Ten SSA women participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews about their history of experiencing homophobia, the resistance strategies they used, and the psychological impact of these over their lifetime. The data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Four categories were identified among the range of resistance strategies participants reported using: challenging, deflection, finding community and protective strategies. SSA women reported that their resilience increased as a result of directly challenging homophobia in their daily lives, along with engaging with members of the SSA community for emotional and social support.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-124
Number of pages17
JournalThe Australian Community Psychologist
Volume29
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018

Cite this

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title = "Australian same-sex attracted women resisting sexism and homophobia: a qualitative investigation",
abstract = "The paper reports on research which explores how Australian same-sex attracted (SSA) women use resistance strategies to cope and build resilience in the face of sexism and homophobia. Ten SSA women participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews about their history of experiencing homophobia, the resistance strategies they used, and the psychological impact of these over their lifetime. The data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Four categories were identified among the range of resistance strategies participants reported using: challenging, deflection, finding community and protective strategies. SSA women reported that their resilience increased as a result of directly challenging homophobia in their daily lives, along with engaging with members of the SSA community for emotional and social support.",
author = "Natasha Smith and {Graetz Simmonds}, Janette",
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Australian same-sex attracted women resisting sexism and homophobia : a qualitative investigation. / Smith, Natasha; Graetz Simmonds, Janette.

In: The Australian Community Psychologist, Vol. 29, No. 2, 12.2018, p. 108-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AB - The paper reports on research which explores how Australian same-sex attracted (SSA) women use resistance strategies to cope and build resilience in the face of sexism and homophobia. Ten SSA women participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews about their history of experiencing homophobia, the resistance strategies they used, and the psychological impact of these over their lifetime. The data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Four categories were identified among the range of resistance strategies participants reported using: challenging, deflection, finding community and protective strategies. SSA women reported that their resilience increased as a result of directly challenging homophobia in their daily lives, along with engaging with members of the SSA community for emotional and social support.

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JO - The Australian Community Psychologist

JF - The Australian Community Psychologist

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