Australian public opinion on asylum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Australia has a policy of deterring attempts by asylum seekers to reach
the country by boat. In 2001 and again in 2013 a policy of offshore
processing was implemented and since 2013 the government has
determined that no asylum seeker reaching Australia by boat will
be eligible for resettlement in Australia. In addition, current policy
provides for the turning back of boats at sea when it is safe to do so,
to maintain the integrity of the country’s borders. This article considers
Australian public attitudes to asylum policy. It finds that while there is
majority support for the right to seek asylum, in response to questions
on boat arrivals strong negative views outnumber the strong positive
by more than two to one. The findings also show that the young,
females, tertiary educated, financially better off and those born in the
United Kingdom are more likely oppose turning refugee boats back.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-447
Number of pages13
JournalMigration and development
Volume7
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Asylum, refugees, boat arrivals, public opinion, Australia

Cite this

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title = "Australian public opinion on asylum",
abstract = "Australia has a policy of deterring attempts by asylum seekers to reachthe country by boat. In 2001 and again in 2013 a policy of offshoreprocessing was implemented and since 2013 the government hasdetermined that no asylum seeker reaching Australia by boat willbe eligible for resettlement in Australia. In addition, current policyprovides for the turning back of boats at sea when it is safe to do so,to maintain the integrity of the country’s borders. This article considersAustralian public attitudes to asylum policy. It finds that while there ismajority support for the right to seek asylum, in response to questionson boat arrivals strong negative views outnumber the strong positiveby more than two to one. The findings also show that the young,females, tertiary educated, financially better off and those born in theUnited Kingdom are more likely oppose turning refugee boats back.",
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author = "Markus, {Andrew Barry} and Dharma Arunachalam",
year = "2018",
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journal = "Migration and development",
issn = "2163-2324",
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Australian public opinion on asylum. / Markus, Andrew Barry; Arunachalam, Dharma.

In: Migration and development, Vol. 7, No. 3, 2018, p. 435-447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Australian public opinion on asylum

AU - Markus, Andrew Barry

AU - Arunachalam, Dharma

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Australia has a policy of deterring attempts by asylum seekers to reachthe country by boat. In 2001 and again in 2013 a policy of offshoreprocessing was implemented and since 2013 the government hasdetermined that no asylum seeker reaching Australia by boat willbe eligible for resettlement in Australia. In addition, current policyprovides for the turning back of boats at sea when it is safe to do so,to maintain the integrity of the country’s borders. This article considersAustralian public attitudes to asylum policy. It finds that while there ismajority support for the right to seek asylum, in response to questionson boat arrivals strong negative views outnumber the strong positiveby more than two to one. The findings also show that the young,females, tertiary educated, financially better off and those born in theUnited Kingdom are more likely oppose turning refugee boats back.

AB - Australia has a policy of deterring attempts by asylum seekers to reachthe country by boat. In 2001 and again in 2013 a policy of offshoreprocessing was implemented and since 2013 the government hasdetermined that no asylum seeker reaching Australia by boat willbe eligible for resettlement in Australia. In addition, current policyprovides for the turning back of boats at sea when it is safe to do so,to maintain the integrity of the country’s borders. This article considersAustralian public attitudes to asylum policy. It finds that while there ismajority support for the right to seek asylum, in response to questionson boat arrivals strong negative views outnumber the strong positiveby more than two to one. The findings also show that the young,females, tertiary educated, financially better off and those born in theUnited Kingdom are more likely oppose turning refugee boats back.

KW - Asylum, refugees, boat arrivals, public opinion, Australia

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 435

EP - 447

JO - Migration and development

JF - Migration and development

SN - 2163-2324

IS - 3

ER -