At least it won't hurt

The personal risks of antibiotic exposure

Andrew J. Stewardson, Benedikt Huttner, Stephan Harbarth

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This review presents recent evidence regarding the adverse effects of antibiotic therapy mediated by collateral damage to commensal flora. Two major drivers have characterized recent research in this field: new perspectives into human microbiota afforded by next-generation DNA sequencing techniques and ongoing attention to antimicrobial resistance. New molecular techniques have illustrated that antibiotic therapy can disturb human microbiota, and that these changes are associated with infection. Concurrently, epidemiologic studies using patient-level data offer new insights into the role of antibiotics in the emergence, selection and spread of antimicrobial resistance, and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)446-452
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Pharmacology
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Stewardson, Andrew J. ; Huttner, Benedikt ; Harbarth, Stephan. / At least it won't hurt : The personal risks of antibiotic exposure. In: Current Opinion in Pharmacology. 2011 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 446-452.
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At least it won't hurt : The personal risks of antibiotic exposure. / Stewardson, Andrew J.; Huttner, Benedikt; Harbarth, Stephan.

In: Current Opinion in Pharmacology, Vol. 11, No. 5, 10.2011, p. 446-452.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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