Associations between early shared music activities in the home and later child outcomes: Findings from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children

Kate E. Williams, Margaret S. Barrett, Graham F. Welch, Vicky Abad, Mary Broughton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The benefits of early shared book reading between parents and children have long been established, yet the same cannot be said for early shared music activities in the home. This study investigated the parent-child home music activities in a sample of 3031 Australian children participating in Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) study. Frequency of shared home music activities was reported by parents when children were 2-3 years and a range of social, emotional, and cognitive outcomes were measured by parent and teacher report and direct testing two years later when children were 4-5 years old. A series of regression analyses (controlling for a set of important socio-demographic variables) found frequency of shared home music activities to have a small significant partial association with measures of children's vocabulary, numeracy, attentional and emotional regulation, and prosocial skills. We then included both book reading and shared home music activities in the same models and found that frequency of shared home music activities maintained small partial associations with measures of prosocial skills, attentional regulation, and numeracy. Our findings suggest there may be a role for parent-child home music activities in supporting children's development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-124
Number of pages12
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume31
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Early childhood
  • Home learning environment
  • Home music activities
  • Self-regulation
  • Shared book reading
  • Shared music-making

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