Association between serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis

Result from a prospective cohort study

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: There is ongoing debate regarding the optimal serum concentrations of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D for musculoskeletal health, including osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this prospective cohort study was to determine whether serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations were associated with the risk of hip arthroplasty for OA. Design: This study examined 9135 participants from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study who had serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D measured in 1999-2000 and were aged ≥40 years at the commencement of arthroplasty data collection. The incidence of hip arthroplasty for OA during 2002-2011 was determined by linking cohort records to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Results: Over an average 9.1 (standard deviation (SD) 2.7) years of follow-up, 201 hip arthroplasties for OA were identified (males n = 90; females n = 111). In males, a one-standard-deviation increase in 25-hydroxy-vitamin D was associated with a 25% increased incidence (HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.02-1.56), with a dose response relationship evident by quartiles of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentration (P for trend 0.04). These results were independent of age, body mass index (BMI), ethnicity, smoking status, physical activity, season of blood collection, latitude, hypertension and diabetes, area level disadvantage or after excluding those with extreme low 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations. No significant association was observed in women (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.87, 1.39). Conclusions: Increasing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations were associated with an increased risk of hip arthroplasty for OA in males, while no significant association was observed in females. The mechanism for the association warrants further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2134-2140
Number of pages7
JournalOsteoarthritis and Cartilage
Volume23
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2015

Keywords

  • 25-Hydroxy-vitamin D
  • Hip arthroplasty
  • Osteoarthritis

Cite this

@article{74b890713ff84bff9dcd0170a3bf3b6b,
title = "Association between serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis: Result from a prospective cohort study",
abstract = "Objectives: There is ongoing debate regarding the optimal serum concentrations of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D for musculoskeletal health, including osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this prospective cohort study was to determine whether serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations were associated with the risk of hip arthroplasty for OA. Design: This study examined 9135 participants from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study who had serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D measured in 1999-2000 and were aged ≥40 years at the commencement of arthroplasty data collection. The incidence of hip arthroplasty for OA during 2002-2011 was determined by linking cohort records to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Results: Over an average 9.1 (standard deviation (SD) 2.7) years of follow-up, 201 hip arthroplasties for OA were identified (males n = 90; females n = 111). In males, a one-standard-deviation increase in 25-hydroxy-vitamin D was associated with a 25{\%} increased incidence (HR 1.25, 95{\%} CI 1.02-1.56), with a dose response relationship evident by quartiles of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentration (P for trend 0.04). These results were independent of age, body mass index (BMI), ethnicity, smoking status, physical activity, season of blood collection, latitude, hypertension and diabetes, area level disadvantage or after excluding those with extreme low 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations. No significant association was observed in women (HR 1.10, 95{\%} CI 0.87, 1.39). Conclusions: Increasing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations were associated with an increased risk of hip arthroplasty for OA in males, while no significant association was observed in females. The mechanism for the association warrants further investigation.",
keywords = "25-Hydroxy-vitamin D, Hip arthroplasty, Osteoarthritis",
author = "Hussain, {Mariam Sogra} and Daly, {Robin M} and YuanYuan Wang and Shaw, {Jonathan Edward} and Magliano, {Dianna Josephine} and Graves, {Stephen E} and Ebeling, {Peter Robert} and Wluka, {Anita Estelle} and Cicuttini, {Flavia Maria}",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.joca.2015.06.006",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "2134--2140",
journal = "Osteoarthritis and Cartilage",
issn = "1063-4584",
publisher = "Elsevier",
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T1 - Association between serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and the risk of hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis

T2 - Result from a prospective cohort study

AU - Hussain, Mariam Sogra

AU - Daly, Robin M

AU - Wang, YuanYuan

AU - Shaw, Jonathan Edward

AU - Magliano, Dianna Josephine

AU - Graves, Stephen E

AU - Ebeling, Peter Robert

AU - Wluka, Anita Estelle

AU - Cicuttini, Flavia Maria

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - Objectives: There is ongoing debate regarding the optimal serum concentrations of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D for musculoskeletal health, including osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this prospective cohort study was to determine whether serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations were associated with the risk of hip arthroplasty for OA. Design: This study examined 9135 participants from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study who had serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D measured in 1999-2000 and were aged ≥40 years at the commencement of arthroplasty data collection. The incidence of hip arthroplasty for OA during 2002-2011 was determined by linking cohort records to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Results: Over an average 9.1 (standard deviation (SD) 2.7) years of follow-up, 201 hip arthroplasties for OA were identified (males n = 90; females n = 111). In males, a one-standard-deviation increase in 25-hydroxy-vitamin D was associated with a 25% increased incidence (HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.02-1.56), with a dose response relationship evident by quartiles of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentration (P for trend 0.04). These results were independent of age, body mass index (BMI), ethnicity, smoking status, physical activity, season of blood collection, latitude, hypertension and diabetes, area level disadvantage or after excluding those with extreme low 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations. No significant association was observed in women (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.87, 1.39). Conclusions: Increasing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations were associated with an increased risk of hip arthroplasty for OA in males, while no significant association was observed in females. The mechanism for the association warrants further investigation.

AB - Objectives: There is ongoing debate regarding the optimal serum concentrations of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D for musculoskeletal health, including osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this prospective cohort study was to determine whether serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations were associated with the risk of hip arthroplasty for OA. Design: This study examined 9135 participants from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study who had serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D measured in 1999-2000 and were aged ≥40 years at the commencement of arthroplasty data collection. The incidence of hip arthroplasty for OA during 2002-2011 was determined by linking cohort records to the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Results: Over an average 9.1 (standard deviation (SD) 2.7) years of follow-up, 201 hip arthroplasties for OA were identified (males n = 90; females n = 111). In males, a one-standard-deviation increase in 25-hydroxy-vitamin D was associated with a 25% increased incidence (HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.02-1.56), with a dose response relationship evident by quartiles of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentration (P for trend 0.04). These results were independent of age, body mass index (BMI), ethnicity, smoking status, physical activity, season of blood collection, latitude, hypertension and diabetes, area level disadvantage or after excluding those with extreme low 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations. No significant association was observed in women (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.87, 1.39). Conclusions: Increasing serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations were associated with an increased risk of hip arthroplasty for OA in males, while no significant association was observed in females. The mechanism for the association warrants further investigation.

KW - 25-Hydroxy-vitamin D

KW - Hip arthroplasty

KW - Osteoarthritis

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U2 - 10.1016/j.joca.2015.06.006

DO - 10.1016/j.joca.2015.06.006

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 2134

EP - 2140

JO - Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

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SN - 1063-4584

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