Association between cognitive impairments and anxiety disorders following traumatic brain injury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the association between cognitive impairment and anxiety disorders following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-six participants recruited from a rehabilitation hospital completed the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition) and cognitive tests at one year post injury. Prevalence of anxiety disorder was 27.3 . Logistic regression analyses revealed that the attention/working memory, information processing, and executive functions models were significantly associated with anxiety disorder. The memory model was not significant. Processing speed emerged as the strongest model associated with anxiety disorder. The role of cognitive impairment in the etiology of anxiety disorders after TBI is discussed, and treatment implications are explored.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1 - 14
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

@article{220e719d683c46e9a63517d3ab732f12,
title = "Association between cognitive impairments and anxiety disorders following traumatic brain injury",
abstract = "This study examined the association between cognitive impairment and anxiety disorders following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-six participants recruited from a rehabilitation hospital completed the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition) and cognitive tests at one year post injury. Prevalence of anxiety disorder was 27.3 . Logistic regression analyses revealed that the attention/working memory, information processing, and executive functions models were significantly associated with anxiety disorder. The memory model was not significant. Processing speed emerged as the strongest model associated with anxiety disorder. The role of cognitive impairment in the etiology of anxiety disorders after TBI is discussed, and treatment implications are explored.",
author = "Gould, {Kate Rachel} and Ponsford, {Jennie Louise} and Gershon Spitz",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1080/13803395.2013.863832",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "1 -- 14",
journal = "Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology",
issn = "1380-3395",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association between cognitive impairments and anxiety disorders following traumatic brain injury

AU - Gould, Kate Rachel

AU - Ponsford, Jennie Louise

AU - Spitz, Gershon

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - This study examined the association between cognitive impairment and anxiety disorders following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-six participants recruited from a rehabilitation hospital completed the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition) and cognitive tests at one year post injury. Prevalence of anxiety disorder was 27.3 . Logistic regression analyses revealed that the attention/working memory, information processing, and executive functions models were significantly associated with anxiety disorder. The memory model was not significant. Processing speed emerged as the strongest model associated with anxiety disorder. The role of cognitive impairment in the etiology of anxiety disorders after TBI is discussed, and treatment implications are explored.

AB - This study examined the association between cognitive impairment and anxiety disorders following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-six participants recruited from a rehabilitation hospital completed the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition) and cognitive tests at one year post injury. Prevalence of anxiety disorder was 27.3 . Logistic regression analyses revealed that the attention/working memory, information processing, and executive functions models were significantly associated with anxiety disorder. The memory model was not significant. Processing speed emerged as the strongest model associated with anxiety disorder. The role of cognitive impairment in the etiology of anxiety disorders after TBI is discussed, and treatment implications are explored.

UR - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13803395.2013.863832?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3dpubmed#.VAeveZ1--70

U2 - 10.1080/13803395.2013.863832

DO - 10.1080/13803395.2013.863832

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 1

EP - 14

JO - Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology

JF - Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology

SN - 1380-3395

IS - 1

ER -