Association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature in China

A national cross-sectional survey

Qin Li, Hai Jun Wang, Yi Song, Jun Ma, Jie Yun Song, Yuming Guo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is well documented that short-term exposure to extreme ambient temperature is associated with respiratory disorder. However, few studies have assessed the long-term effect of temperature on children's lung function. The present study aimed to investigate the association between long-term exposure to local ambient temperature and children's forced vital capacity (FVC) in China. We analyzed the FVC data of 71,768 children from the 2010 Chinese National Survey on Students' Construction and Health (CHNSCH), and local annual average ambient temperature, relative humidity, air pollutants data from China Meteorological Administration and Ministry of Environment Protection of China. Generalized additive model (GAM) with non-linear function was used to examine the effect of ambient temperature on children's FVC. The results showed that low temperature was significantly associated with decrease of FVC in Chinese children within certain temperature range while adjusting for individual characteristics, socioeconomic conditions, air pollutants and relative humidity. The largest alteration of FVC related to the annual average temperature difference among cities from 20.4 °C to 4.5 °C was observed, being 242.7 ml (95%CI: 220.0, 265.3) decrease in FVC. The similar association was found in both physically active and inactive children, while the largest alteration of FVC related to the temperature difference reached 329.1 ml (95%CI: 296.7, 361.6) in physically active children and 290.5 ml (95%CI: 255.7, 325.3) in physically inactive ones. Public health policy should be developed for protecting children's respiratory health during growth and development in some areas with cold weather. Key messageWhat is the key question?Few studies have assessed the long-term effect of temperature on children's forced vital capacity (FVC). We analyzed the Chinese national survey data to clarify the association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature. What is the bottom line?Our study found that low temperature was significantly associated with decrease of forced vital capacity in children of 30 cities in China. The largest alteration of FVC related to the temperature difference from 20.4 °C to 4.5 °C was observed, being 242.7 ml (95%CI: 220.0, 265.3) decrease in FVC.Why read on?The presented study provide some evidence about long-term effect of temperature on children's respiratory health and public health policy should be developed for protecting children from adverse effects of low temperature on their respiratory health during growth and development in some areas with cold weather.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)880-887
Number of pages8
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume557-558
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Children
  • Forced vital capacity
  • Long-term exposure
  • Temperature

Cite this

@article{bc2b1258d16746348f7f226571b0b908,
title = "Association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature in China: A national cross-sectional survey",
abstract = "It is well documented that short-term exposure to extreme ambient temperature is associated with respiratory disorder. However, few studies have assessed the long-term effect of temperature on children's lung function. The present study aimed to investigate the association between long-term exposure to local ambient temperature and children's forced vital capacity (FVC) in China. We analyzed the FVC data of 71,768 children from the 2010 Chinese National Survey on Students' Construction and Health (CHNSCH), and local annual average ambient temperature, relative humidity, air pollutants data from China Meteorological Administration and Ministry of Environment Protection of China. Generalized additive model (GAM) with non-linear function was used to examine the effect of ambient temperature on children's FVC. The results showed that low temperature was significantly associated with decrease of FVC in Chinese children within certain temperature range while adjusting for individual characteristics, socioeconomic conditions, air pollutants and relative humidity. The largest alteration of FVC related to the annual average temperature difference among cities from 20.4 °C to 4.5 °C was observed, being 242.7 ml (95{\%}CI: 220.0, 265.3) decrease in FVC. The similar association was found in both physically active and inactive children, while the largest alteration of FVC related to the temperature difference reached 329.1 ml (95{\%}CI: 296.7, 361.6) in physically active children and 290.5 ml (95{\%}CI: 255.7, 325.3) in physically inactive ones. Public health policy should be developed for protecting children's respiratory health during growth and development in some areas with cold weather. Key messageWhat is the key question?Few studies have assessed the long-term effect of temperature on children's forced vital capacity (FVC). We analyzed the Chinese national survey data to clarify the association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature. What is the bottom line?Our study found that low temperature was significantly associated with decrease of forced vital capacity in children of 30 cities in China. The largest alteration of FVC related to the temperature difference from 20.4 °C to 4.5 °C was observed, being 242.7 ml (95{\%}CI: 220.0, 265.3) decrease in FVC.Why read on?The presented study provide some evidence about long-term effect of temperature on children's respiratory health and public health policy should be developed for protecting children from adverse effects of low temperature on their respiratory health during growth and development in some areas with cold weather.",
keywords = "Children, Forced vital capacity, Long-term exposure, Temperature",
author = "Qin Li and Wang, {Hai Jun} and Yi Song and Jun Ma and Song, {Jie Yun} and Yuming Guo",
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Association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature in China : A national cross-sectional survey. / Li, Qin; Wang, Hai Jun; Song, Yi; Ma, Jun; Song, Jie Yun; Guo, Yuming.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 557-558, 01.07.2016, p. 880-887.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature in China

T2 - A national cross-sectional survey

AU - Li, Qin

AU - Wang, Hai Jun

AU - Song, Yi

AU - Ma, Jun

AU - Song, Jie Yun

AU - Guo, Yuming

PY - 2016/7/1

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N2 - It is well documented that short-term exposure to extreme ambient temperature is associated with respiratory disorder. However, few studies have assessed the long-term effect of temperature on children's lung function. The present study aimed to investigate the association between long-term exposure to local ambient temperature and children's forced vital capacity (FVC) in China. We analyzed the FVC data of 71,768 children from the 2010 Chinese National Survey on Students' Construction and Health (CHNSCH), and local annual average ambient temperature, relative humidity, air pollutants data from China Meteorological Administration and Ministry of Environment Protection of China. Generalized additive model (GAM) with non-linear function was used to examine the effect of ambient temperature on children's FVC. The results showed that low temperature was significantly associated with decrease of FVC in Chinese children within certain temperature range while adjusting for individual characteristics, socioeconomic conditions, air pollutants and relative humidity. The largest alteration of FVC related to the annual average temperature difference among cities from 20.4 °C to 4.5 °C was observed, being 242.7 ml (95%CI: 220.0, 265.3) decrease in FVC. The similar association was found in both physically active and inactive children, while the largest alteration of FVC related to the temperature difference reached 329.1 ml (95%CI: 296.7, 361.6) in physically active children and 290.5 ml (95%CI: 255.7, 325.3) in physically inactive ones. Public health policy should be developed for protecting children's respiratory health during growth and development in some areas with cold weather. Key messageWhat is the key question?Few studies have assessed the long-term effect of temperature on children's forced vital capacity (FVC). We analyzed the Chinese national survey data to clarify the association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature. What is the bottom line?Our study found that low temperature was significantly associated with decrease of forced vital capacity in children of 30 cities in China. The largest alteration of FVC related to the temperature difference from 20.4 °C to 4.5 °C was observed, being 242.7 ml (95%CI: 220.0, 265.3) decrease in FVC.Why read on?The presented study provide some evidence about long-term effect of temperature on children's respiratory health and public health policy should be developed for protecting children from adverse effects of low temperature on their respiratory health during growth and development in some areas with cold weather.

AB - It is well documented that short-term exposure to extreme ambient temperature is associated with respiratory disorder. However, few studies have assessed the long-term effect of temperature on children's lung function. The present study aimed to investigate the association between long-term exposure to local ambient temperature and children's forced vital capacity (FVC) in China. We analyzed the FVC data of 71,768 children from the 2010 Chinese National Survey on Students' Construction and Health (CHNSCH), and local annual average ambient temperature, relative humidity, air pollutants data from China Meteorological Administration and Ministry of Environment Protection of China. Generalized additive model (GAM) with non-linear function was used to examine the effect of ambient temperature on children's FVC. The results showed that low temperature was significantly associated with decrease of FVC in Chinese children within certain temperature range while adjusting for individual characteristics, socioeconomic conditions, air pollutants and relative humidity. The largest alteration of FVC related to the annual average temperature difference among cities from 20.4 °C to 4.5 °C was observed, being 242.7 ml (95%CI: 220.0, 265.3) decrease in FVC. The similar association was found in both physically active and inactive children, while the largest alteration of FVC related to the temperature difference reached 329.1 ml (95%CI: 296.7, 361.6) in physically active children and 290.5 ml (95%CI: 255.7, 325.3) in physically inactive ones. Public health policy should be developed for protecting children's respiratory health during growth and development in some areas with cold weather. Key messageWhat is the key question?Few studies have assessed the long-term effect of temperature on children's forced vital capacity (FVC). We analyzed the Chinese national survey data to clarify the association between children's forced vital capacity and long-term exposure to local ambient temperature. What is the bottom line?Our study found that low temperature was significantly associated with decrease of forced vital capacity in children of 30 cities in China. The largest alteration of FVC related to the temperature difference from 20.4 °C to 4.5 °C was observed, being 242.7 ml (95%CI: 220.0, 265.3) decrease in FVC.Why read on?The presented study provide some evidence about long-term effect of temperature on children's respiratory health and public health policy should be developed for protecting children from adverse effects of low temperature on their respiratory health during growth and development in some areas with cold weather.

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