Asset mapping and social innovation for low carbon communities

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Low carbon community programs that encourage citizens to reduce their carbon emissions have been subject to various government and civil society trials in recent years. Behaviour change programs using ‘social marketing’techniques have had mixed success in community carbon reduction because of a focus on individual control and lack of systemic context.‘Asset-based community development’(ABCD) is a strength-based tool that has been successfully used in the community sector to reveal the hidden assets of individuals and views communities as the starting point for change and abundant in capacity for sustainability interventions at the grassroots level. This paper will detail the development of a ‘low carbon community’trial known as Livewell Yarra, a'Living Lab’action research project funded by the CRC for Low Carbon Living in partnership with Curtin University, the City of Yarra and the Yarra Energy Foundation. This research uses asset mapping as a method to reveal the latent knowledge, interests and skills of Livewell participants and mobilise these strengths to meet carbon reduction goals. Participatory co-design is being used to enable participants to develop social innovations for carbon reduction in their local community which could take the form of community gardens, active transport or neighbourhood-based sharing initiatives. This paper provides an overview of the Livewell Yarra trial and its theoretical underpinnings and explores how asset-based approaches and social innovation can build capacity for groups to take individual and collective action to reduce carbon emissions for their own benefit and that of the wider community.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of Making Cities Liveable Conference 2015
EditorsPaula Drayton, Caroline Miller, Kirsten Potoczky, Lennert Veerman, Peter Sugg, Kerryn Wilmot
Place of PublicationNerang QLD Australia
PublisherAssociation for Sustainability in Business Incorporated
Pages153-172
Number of pages20
ISBN (Print)9781922232304
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes
EventMaking Cities Liveable Conference 2015: Liveable Cities for the Future - Pullman Melbourne on the Park, Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 6 Jul 20157 Jul 2015
Conference number: 8th

Conference

ConferenceMaking Cities Liveable Conference 2015
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period6/07/157/07/15

Cite this

Sharp, D. (2015). Asset mapping and social innovation for low carbon communities. In P. Drayton, C. Miller, K. Potoczky, L. Veerman, P. Sugg, & K. Wilmot (Eds.), Proceedings of Making Cities Liveable Conference 2015 (pp. 153-172). Nerang QLD Australia: Association for Sustainability in Business Incorporated.
Sharp, Darren. / Asset mapping and social innovation for low carbon communities. Proceedings of Making Cities Liveable Conference 2015. editor / Paula Drayton ; Caroline Miller ; Kirsten Potoczky ; Lennert Veerman ; Peter Sugg ; Kerryn Wilmot. Nerang QLD Australia : Association for Sustainability in Business Incorporated, 2015. pp. 153-172
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title = "Asset mapping and social innovation for low carbon communities",
abstract = "Low carbon community programs that encourage citizens to reduce their carbon emissions have been subject to various government and civil society trials in recent years. Behaviour change programs using ‘social marketing’techniques have had mixed success in community carbon reduction because of a focus on individual control and lack of systemic context.‘Asset-based community development’(ABCD) is a strength-based tool that has been successfully used in the community sector to reveal the hidden assets of individuals and views communities as the starting point for change and abundant in capacity for sustainability interventions at the grassroots level. This paper will detail the development of a ‘low carbon community’trial known as Livewell Yarra, a'Living Lab’action research project funded by the CRC for Low Carbon Living in partnership with Curtin University, the City of Yarra and the Yarra Energy Foundation. This research uses asset mapping as a method to reveal the latent knowledge, interests and skills of Livewell participants and mobilise these strengths to meet carbon reduction goals. Participatory co-design is being used to enable participants to develop social innovations for carbon reduction in their local community which could take the form of community gardens, active transport or neighbourhood-based sharing initiatives. This paper provides an overview of the Livewell Yarra trial and its theoretical underpinnings and explores how asset-based approaches and social innovation can build capacity for groups to take individual and collective action to reduce carbon emissions for their own benefit and that of the wider community.",
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Sharp, D 2015, Asset mapping and social innovation for low carbon communities. in P Drayton, C Miller, K Potoczky, L Veerman, P Sugg & K Wilmot (eds), Proceedings of Making Cities Liveable Conference 2015. Association for Sustainability in Business Incorporated, Nerang QLD Australia, pp. 153-172, Making Cities Liveable Conference 2015, Melbourne, Australia, 6/07/15.

Asset mapping and social innovation for low carbon communities. / Sharp, Darren.

Proceedings of Making Cities Liveable Conference 2015. ed. / Paula Drayton; Caroline Miller; Kirsten Potoczky; Lennert Veerman; Peter Sugg; Kerryn Wilmot. Nerang QLD Australia : Association for Sustainability in Business Incorporated, 2015. p. 153-172.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperOtherpeer-review

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Sharp D. Asset mapping and social innovation for low carbon communities. In Drayton P, Miller C, Potoczky K, Veerman L, Sugg P, Wilmot K, editors, Proceedings of Making Cities Liveable Conference 2015. Nerang QLD Australia: Association for Sustainability in Business Incorporated. 2015. p. 153-172