Assessing the impacts of lifetime sun exposure on skin damage and skin aging using a non-invasive method

Michael G. Kimlin, Yuming Guo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Ultraviolet radiation exposure during an individuals' lifetime is a known risk factor for the development of skin cancer. However, less evidence is available on assessing the relationship between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging. Objectives: This study aims to assess the relationship between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging using a non-invasive measure of exposure. Methods: We recruited 180 participants (73 males, 107 females) aged 18-83. years. Digital imaging of skin hyperpigmentation (skin damage) and skin wrinkling (skin aging) on the facial region was measured. Lifetime sun exposure (presented as hours) was calculated from the participants' age multiplied by the estimated annual time outdoors for each year of life. We analyzed the effects of lifetime sun exposure on skin damage and skin aging. We adjust for the influence of age, sex, occupation, history of skin cancer, eye color, hair color, and skin color. Results: There were non-linear relationships between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging. Younger participant's skin is much more sensitive to sun exposure than those who were over 50. years of age. As such, there were negative interactions between lifetime sun exposure and age. Age had linear effects on skin damage and skin aging. Conclusion: The data presented showed that self reported lifetime sun exposure was positively associated with skin damage and skin aging, in particular, the younger people. Future health promotion for sun exposure needs to pay attention to this group for skin cancer prevention messaging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-41
Number of pages7
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume425
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Age
  • Lifetime
  • Skin aging
  • Skin damage
  • Sun exposure

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