Are Technologies Innocent? Part Four: The "dumb Instrument " Argument

Michael Arnold, Christopher Pearce

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In Part One of the series it was suggested that technologies are not innocent, and should be held to moral account. In most interpretations of Western moral philosophy, moral judgement does not extend to non-humans, and for non-humans to be included, a number of objections need to be overcome. The objections include: the arguments that morality is the exclusivity domain of humans (considered in Part Two), the argument that nonhumans don't really act (considered in Part Three), the argument that technologies are just dumb instrument (to be taken up here, in Part Four), the free will argument (forthcoming in Part Five) and the dilution of responsibility argument (forthcoming in Part Six).

Original languageEnglish
Article number7563952
Pages (from-to)86-87
Number of pages2
JournalIEEE Technology and Society Magazine
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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Are Technologies Innocent? Part Four: The "dumb Instrument " Argument. / Arnold, Michael; Pearce, Christopher.

In: IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, Vol. 35, No. 3, 7563952, 01.09.2016, p. 86-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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