Are cultural characteristics associated with the relationship between self and others' ratings of leadership?

Leanne Atwater, Mo Wang, James W. Smither, John W. Fleenor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between self and subordinate ratings of leadership and the relationship between self and peer ratings of leadership for 964 managers from 21 countries. Using multilevel modeling, the authors found that cultural characteristics moderated the relationship between self and others' ratings of leadership. Specifically, the relationship between self and subordinate ratings, as well as between self and peer ratings, was more positive in countries that are characterized by high assertiveness. The relationship between self and subordinate ratings, as well as between self and peer ratings, was also more positive in countries characterized by high power distance. The authors also found a leniency bias in individualistic cultures for self, peer, and subordinate ratings. In sum, cultural characteristics should be considered in attempts to understand relationships between self and other ratings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)876-886
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume94
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • culture
  • leadership
  • self-other agreement

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