Application of raman spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy in the identification of breast cancer

Joanna Depciuch, Ewa Kaznowska, Izabela Zawlik, Renata Wojnarowska, Marian Cholewa, Philip Heraud, Jozef Cebulski

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58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Raman spectroscopy and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are both techniques that allow for the investigation of vibrating chemical particles. These techniques provide information not only about chemical particles through the identification of functional groups and spectral analysis of so-called “fingerprints”, these methods allow for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of chemical substances in the sample. Both of these spectral techniques are frequently being used in biology and medicine in diagnosing illnesses and monitoring methods of therapy. The type of breast cancer found in woman is often a malignant tumor, causing 1.38 million new cases of breast cancer and 458 000 deaths in the world in 2013. The most important risk factors for breast cancer development are: sex, age, family history, specific benign breast conditions in the breast, ionizing radiation, and lifestyle. The main purpose of breast cancer screening tests is to establish early diagnostics and to apply proper treatment. Diagnoses of breast cancer are based on: (1) physical techniques (e.g., ultrasonography, mammography, elastography, magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography [PET]); (2) histopathological techniques; (3) biological techniques; and (4) optical techniques (e.g., photo acoustic imaging, fluorescence tomography). However, none of these techniques provides unique or especially revealing answers. The aim of our study is comparative spectroscopic measurements on patients with the following: normal non-cancerous breast tissue; breast cancer tissues before chemotherapy; breast cancer tissues after chemotherapy; and normal breast tissues received around the cancerous breast region. Spectra collected from breast cancer patients shows changes in amounts of carotenoids and fats. We also observed changes in carbohydrate and protein levels (e.g., lack of amino acids, changes in the concentration of amino acids, structural changes) in comparison with normal breast tissues. This fact verifies that Raman spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy are very useful diagnostic tools that will shed new light in understanding the etiology of breast cancer.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-263
Number of pages13
JournalApplied Spectroscopy
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • raman spectroscopy
  • fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
  • chemotherapy

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