Apoptotic Caspases

Multiple or Mistaken Identities?

Kate McArthur, Benjamin T. Kile

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The mitochondrial caspase cascade was originally thought to be required for apoptotic death driven by Bak/Bax-mediated intrinsic apoptosis. It has also been ascribed several ‘non-apoptotic’ functions, including differentiation, proliferation, and cellular reprogramming. Recent work has demonstrated that, during apoptosis, the caspase cascade suppresses damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP)-initiated production of cytokines such as type I interferon by the dying cell. The caspase cascade is not required for death to occur; instead, it shapes the immunogenic properties of the apoptotic cell. This raises questions about the role of apoptotic caspases in regulating DAMP signaling more generally, puts a new perspective on their non-apoptotic functions, and suggests that pharmacological caspase inhibitors might find new applications as antiviral or anticancer agents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)475-493
Number of pages19
JournalTrends in Cell Biology
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

Keywords

  • apoptosis
  • caspase
  • damage-associated molecular pattern

Cite this

McArthur, Kate ; Kile, Benjamin T. / Apoptotic Caspases : Multiple or Mistaken Identities?. In: Trends in Cell Biology. 2018 ; Vol. 28, No. 6. pp. 475-493.
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Apoptotic Caspases : Multiple or Mistaken Identities? / McArthur, Kate; Kile, Benjamin T.

In: Trends in Cell Biology, Vol. 28, No. 6, 01.06.2018, p. 475-493.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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