ANZUS and the rise of China

Remy Davison, Shamsul Khan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

This debate chapter argues that the US alliance remains central to Australia across numerous issue areas, including regional security, defence procurement and trade. Canberra and Washington also maintain important bilateral, regional and multilateral cooperative linkages in a large number of regional and global institutions. Interdependencies and shared interests form the crux of the US-Australia alliance. This chapter further asserts that, beyond trade interdependence, Canberra and Beijing have few interests in common and, indeed, Chinese foreign policy in practice is frequently diametrically opposed to Australian regional and global interests, as it partners and protects regimes that threaten regional stability, while its military modernisation may bring Beijing into direct conflict with Washington.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAustralian Foreign Policy: Controversies and Debates
EditorsDaniel Baldino, Andrew Carr, Anthony J Langlois
Place of PublicationSouth Melbourne VIC Australia
PublisherOxford University Press Australia and New Zealand
Pages135 - 154
Number of pages12
Edition1
ISBN (Print)9780195525632
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

Davison, R., & Khan, S. (2014). ANZUS and the rise of China. In D. Baldino, A. Carr, & A. J. Langlois (Eds.), Australian Foreign Policy: Controversies and Debates (1 ed., pp. 135 - 154). South Melbourne VIC Australia: Oxford University Press Australia and New Zealand.
Davison, Remy ; Khan, Shamsul. / ANZUS and the rise of China. Australian Foreign Policy: Controversies and Debates. editor / Daniel Baldino ; Andrew Carr ; Anthony J Langlois. 1. ed. South Melbourne VIC Australia : Oxford University Press Australia and New Zealand, 2014. pp. 135 - 154
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Davison, R & Khan, S 2014, ANZUS and the rise of China. in D Baldino, A Carr & AJ Langlois (eds), Australian Foreign Policy: Controversies and Debates. 1 edn, Oxford University Press Australia and New Zealand, South Melbourne VIC Australia, pp. 135 - 154.

ANZUS and the rise of China. / Davison, Remy; Khan, Shamsul.

Australian Foreign Policy: Controversies and Debates. ed. / Daniel Baldino; Andrew Carr; Anthony J Langlois. 1. ed. South Melbourne VIC Australia : Oxford University Press Australia and New Zealand, 2014. p. 135 - 154.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

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Davison R, Khan S. ANZUS and the rise of China. In Baldino D, Carr A, Langlois AJ, editors, Australian Foreign Policy: Controversies and Debates. 1 ed. South Melbourne VIC Australia: Oxford University Press Australia and New Zealand. 2014. p. 135 - 154