Anticipating the clinical adoption of regenerative medicine:: Building institutional readiness in the UK

John Grant Gardner, Andrew Webster, Jacqueline Barry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This perspective paper examines the challenges of implementing regenerative medicine therapies within clinical delivery systems. Drawing on recent work in the social sciences, the paper highlights dynamics within existing healthcare systems that will present both hindrances and affordances for the implementation of new regenerative medicine technologies within hospitals and clinics. The paper argues that identifying suitable locations for cell and gene therapy treatment centres requires an assessment of their Institutional Readiness for regenerative medicine. Some provisional criteria for assessing Institutional Readiness are outlined, and the paper will suggest that it is necessary to begin developing a programme for the phased introduction of regenerative medicine in the longer term.
LanguageEnglish
Pages29–39
Number of pages11
JournalRegenerative Medicine
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018

Keywords

  • commissioning
  • GMP
  • hospitals
  • institutional readiness
  • National Health Service
  • risk-sharing
  • technology adoption

Cite this

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Anticipating the clinical adoption of regenerative medicine: : Building institutional readiness in the UK. / Gardner, John Grant; Webster, Andrew; Barry, Jacqueline .

In: Regenerative Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 1, 2018, p. 29–39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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