Anti-inflammatory effects of probiotics and their metabolites: Possible role for epigenetic effects

Nursén Türker, Zheng Quan Toh, Tom C. Karagiannis, Paul V. Licciardi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

It may well be the case that an important part of future medicine is directed not only in the development of novel therapies which restore gut microbiota but also in the administration of preventative strategies through dietary intervention. Dietary changes contribute to 57 % of the total structural variation in gut microbiota, whereas genetic differences attribute no more than 12 %. As such a diet that is rich in complex carbohydrates not only promotes a healthy gut microbiota but also boosts the production of immunomodulatory short chain fatty acids (SCFA) which have HDAC inhibitory properties. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been observed across a wide range of naturally derived compounds which include sulforaphane from broccoli, diallyl disulfide from garlic, and curcumin from turmeric. Identification of potent anti-inflammatory effects of dietary compounds is worth investigating, particularly due to wide accessibility by the general public. Although our current knowledge of restoring gut microbiota through administration of probiotics and their metabolites and naturally derived HDACi is not complete. Future research is required to understand the mechanistic actions and pharmacokinetics involved in dietary HDACi and probiotics to aid in future developments of therapeutic modalities for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. In this chapter we discuss the inflammasomes related in health and disease and outline current and novel therapies for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases including allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases, metabolic syndromes, and autism spectrum disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMolecular Mechanisms and Physiology of Disease
Subtitle of host publicationImplications for Epigenetics and Health
EditorsNilanjana Maulik, Tom Karagiannis
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherSpringer
Pages127-150
Number of pages24
ISBN (Electronic)9781493907069
ISBN (Print)9781493907052
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Histone deacetylase inhibitors
  • Inflammation
  • Metabolites
  • Probiotics
  • Short chain fatty acids

Cite this

Türker, N., Toh, Z. Q., Karagiannis, T. C., & Licciardi, P. V. (2014). Anti-inflammatory effects of probiotics and their metabolites: Possible role for epigenetic effects. In N. Maulik, & T. Karagiannis (Eds.), Molecular Mechanisms and Physiology of Disease: Implications for Epigenetics and Health (pp. 127-150). New York: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-0706-9_5
Türker, Nursén ; Toh, Zheng Quan ; Karagiannis, Tom C. ; Licciardi, Paul V. / Anti-inflammatory effects of probiotics and their metabolites : Possible role for epigenetic effects. Molecular Mechanisms and Physiology of Disease: Implications for Epigenetics and Health. editor / Nilanjana Maulik ; Tom Karagiannis . New York : Springer, 2014. pp. 127-150
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Türker, N, Toh, ZQ, Karagiannis, TC & Licciardi, PV 2014, Anti-inflammatory effects of probiotics and their metabolites: Possible role for epigenetic effects. in N Maulik & T Karagiannis (eds), Molecular Mechanisms and Physiology of Disease: Implications for Epigenetics and Health. Springer, New York, pp. 127-150. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-0706-9_5

Anti-inflammatory effects of probiotics and their metabolites : Possible role for epigenetic effects. / Türker, Nursén; Toh, Zheng Quan; Karagiannis, Tom C.; Licciardi, Paul V.

Molecular Mechanisms and Physiology of Disease: Implications for Epigenetics and Health. ed. / Nilanjana Maulik; Tom Karagiannis . New York : Springer, 2014. p. 127-150.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

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Türker N, Toh ZQ, Karagiannis TC, Licciardi PV. Anti-inflammatory effects of probiotics and their metabolites: Possible role for epigenetic effects. In Maulik N, Karagiannis T, editors, Molecular Mechanisms and Physiology of Disease: Implications for Epigenetics and Health. New York: Springer. 2014. p. 127-150 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-0706-9_5