Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the ovine model

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the most common surgical operation for cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy in patients who have failed conservative treatment. Since the operation was first described by Cloward and Smith and Robinson in 1958, a variety refinements in technique, graft material and implants have been made. In particular, there is a need for safe osteoinductive agents that could benefit selected patients. The ovine model has been shown to have anatomical, biomechanical, bone density and radiological properties that are similar to the human counterpart, the most similar level being C3/4. It is therefore an ideal model in which preclinical studies can be performed. In particular this methodology may be useful to researchers interested in evaluating different devices and biologics, including stem cells, for potential application in human spinal surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1548
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
VolumeE
Issue number32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Cite this

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title = "Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the ovine model",
abstract = "Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the most common surgical operation for cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy in patients who have failed conservative treatment. Since the operation was first described by Cloward and Smith and Robinson in 1958, a variety refinements in technique, graft material and implants have been made. In particular, there is a need for safe osteoinductive agents that could benefit selected patients. The ovine model has been shown to have anatomical, biomechanical, bone density and radiological properties that are similar to the human counterpart, the most similar level being C3/4. It is therefore an ideal model in which preclinical studies can be performed. In particular this methodology may be useful to researchers interested in evaluating different devices and biologics, including stem cells, for potential application in human spinal surgery.",
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Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the ovine model. / Goldschlager, Tony; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey Victor; Young, Ian Ross; Jenkin, Graham.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, Vol. E, No. 32, e1548, 2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the ovine model

AU - Goldschlager, Tony

AU - Rosenfeld, Jeffrey Victor

AU - Young, Ian Ross

AU - Jenkin, Graham

PY - 2009

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AB - Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the most common surgical operation for cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy in patients who have failed conservative treatment. Since the operation was first described by Cloward and Smith and Robinson in 1958, a variety refinements in technique, graft material and implants have been made. In particular, there is a need for safe osteoinductive agents that could benefit selected patients. The ovine model has been shown to have anatomical, biomechanical, bone density and radiological properties that are similar to the human counterpart, the most similar level being C3/4. It is therefore an ideal model in which preclinical studies can be performed. In particular this methodology may be useful to researchers interested in evaluating different devices and biologics, including stem cells, for potential application in human spinal surgery.

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