Anatomy and physics of respiration

Timothy Moss, David Baldwin, Beth Allison, Jane Pillow

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Other

Abstract

During normal inspiration, when the diaphragm and external intercostal muscles of the ribcage contract, expansion of the internal dimensions of the thorax draws the visceral pleural membrane outwards, thus stretching open the lungs. This results in the creation of subatmospheric pressure within the chest; air moves into the lungs to equilibrate pressure. Effective inspiration is thus reliant on the integrity of neural control mechanisms and the structural characteristics of the chest wall. Musculoskeletal disease and other factors that affect chest wall mechanics can have a large impact on the function of the respiratory system (e.g., preterm neonates have compliant chest walls that tend to retract, rather than expand, during diaphragmatic contraction). Relaxation of the inspiratory muscles results in passive recoil of the lungs and chest wall, and causes expiration. During exercise or forced expiration, contraction of the expiratory muscles (the internal intercostals of the ribcage and the muscles of the abdominal wall) generates a positive intrathoracic pressure, thus forcing air from the lungs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHanbook of Physics in Medicine and Biology
EditorsRobert Splinter
Place of PublicationUnited States
PublisherCRC Press
Pages1 - 20
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9781420075250
ISBN (Print)9781420075243
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010

Cite this

Moss, T., Baldwin, D., Allison, B., & Pillow, J. (2010). Anatomy and physics of respiration. In R. Splinter (Ed.), Hanbook of Physics in Medicine and Biology (pp. 1 - 20). United States: CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781420075250
Moss, Timothy ; Baldwin, David ; Allison, Beth ; Pillow, Jane. / Anatomy and physics of respiration. Hanbook of Physics in Medicine and Biology. editor / Robert Splinter. United States : CRC Press, 2010. pp. 1 - 20
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Moss, T, Baldwin, D, Allison, B & Pillow, J 2010, Anatomy and physics of respiration. in R Splinter (ed.), Hanbook of Physics in Medicine and Biology. CRC Press, United States, pp. 1 - 20. https://doi.org/10.1201/9781420075250

Anatomy and physics of respiration. / Moss, Timothy; Baldwin, David; Allison, Beth; Pillow, Jane.

Hanbook of Physics in Medicine and Biology. ed. / Robert Splinter. United States : CRC Press, 2010. p. 1 - 20.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Other

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Moss T, Baldwin D, Allison B, Pillow J. Anatomy and physics of respiration. In Splinter R, editor, Hanbook of Physics in Medicine and Biology. United States: CRC Press. 2010. p. 1 - 20 https://doi.org/10.1201/9781420075250